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Zoom Dinosaurs
DINOSAUR QUESTIONS
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Questions from February 2000



Q: what dinosaurs were present in the north america region at the end of their existance.
from Brad F., Concord, MA, US o' A; February 29, 2000

A: For a list of dinosaurs (listed continent by continent) that lived during the late Cretaceous period, click here.



Q: Who found The Suchominus,how did they know what it ate,did the Sucho probably fight good if battled,and if you know did it swim or dig?
from Matthew E, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada; February 29, 2000

A: David Varricchio discovered Suchomimus' claw on December 4, 1997. Suchomimus was named by Sereno, Beck, Dutheil, Gado, Larsson, Lyon, Marcot, Rauhut, Sadleir, Sidor, Varricchio, G. P. Wilson, and J. A. Wilson in 1998. For information on Suchomimus, click here.



Q: I'm a second grade student & I am doing a report on the Gallimimus dinosaur. I am having trouble finding info. about how they reproduce & how they care for their young. I also need any other info. you could supply. Can you help?
from audra B, englewood, co, USA; February 29, 2000

A: No one knows how Gallimimus reproduced, other than probably laying eggs. No one knows if they cared for their young. For information on Gallimimus, click here.



Q: What is the order of the dinosaur family from earliest to latest?
from Jessica S., Browns Mills, New Jersey, USA; February 29, 2000

A: You can't order them in a line, it;s more like a tree structure. For a cladogram (a diagram based on evolutionary relationships) of the dinosaurs, click here.



Q: where dinasours warm blooded or cool blooded
from al, stanhope, nj, USA; February 29, 2000

A: No one knows. For more information on this topic, click here.



Q: what does the dinosaur Camptosarus looks like ?
from chasity, Springfield, Illinois, USA; February 29, 2000

A: For information and a small drawing of Camptosaurus, click here.



Q: I need information on the dinosaur called Metriohynchus which lived in the Jurassic Period. What were its enemies and what did it eat? What part of the world was it found. Thanks for your help on our research project
from Diane G, Califon, NJ, USA; February 29, 2000

A: For information on Metriohynchus, click here. It was likely the top predator in its environment.



Q: I am in the 2nd grade and I am writing a report on the Parksosaurus. I have had a very hard time finding information on this dinosaur. Do you know any information or where I can find some? Thank you very much!!
from Johnny P, Covina, CA, USA; February 29, 2000

A: For information on Parksosaurus, click here.



Q: could you also answer, how many eggs did a stegosaurus lay at one time?
from anjel g, racine, wisconsin, USA; February 29, 2000

A: No one knows. For information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: how much does a triceratops eat in one day
from nate d, lubbock, tx, USA; February 28, 2000

A: No one knows, it would depend greatly on its metabolic rate, which is unknown.



Q: What are the five major extincitons?
from Claudia M., Austin, TX, USA; February 28, 2000

A: See this page for more information.



Q: Dinosaurs with small teeth that looked like peg ate ______? What words must go in to the ______.[must have to be six letter]
from Zang Han L., Korea; February 28, 2000

A: Plants



Q: The rocks around here are full of fossils, although they are not dinosaurian, just tiny marine stuff. A common fossil (assuming it is a fossil, it sure looks like it) is a small circle, a few millimetres across, with a hole in the middle and fine lines around the outside. It looks very much like a little pineapple ring. Is this some type of shell segment? There are also some obvious seashells, and trilobites, although I have not been lucky enough to find one of those. Thanks in advance.
from Brad M., Woodville, Ontario, Canada; February 27, 2000

A: You're certainly lucky to be in an area with a lot of fossils. You might try your local library; there are a lot of good fossil guide books available. One nice one is the Eyewitness Handbook of Fossils (by C. Walker and D. Ward), the pictures are very clear and there is a lot of information on each of them.



Q: how many years did dinosaurs live on earth ?
from Josiah H., Vineland, NJ, USA; February 27, 2000

A: They lived from about 230 million years ago until 65 million years ago, a total of 165 million years.



Q: How do palentologists know where to look for dinosaur fossils?
from Myles G., Seattle, WA, USA; February 27, 2000

A: They don't. Paleontologists often search for years without finding interesting fossils.



Q: in what country was the first veliciraptor fossil found
from jonh a., melbourne, victoria, australia; February 27, 2000

A: Mongolia. For more info on Velociraptor, click here.



Q: i need some last minute info where protoceratops lived {a specific place}? and where is the location of its current fossil?what would its dietary needs be?please hurry ....... it needs to be in by 3:00 your a life saver thanks
from sam m.; February 27, 2000

A: For information on Protoceratops, click here. Scroll down to the section called "DISCOVERY OF FOSSILS" for where Protoceratops fossils have been found. There are Protoceratops fossils in the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), the Dinosaur Museum of Blanding, Utah, and other museums around the world.



Q: I'm doing a report on diplodocus and I need some last min. information Where was the first Diplodocus fossil found? Where did it live when it was alive? What are some other dinosaurs of the same period? Thanks for the info
from erin s.; February 27, 2000

A: For information on Diplodocus, click here. For other dinosaurs that lived during the late Jurassic Period in North America, click here and go to the section on North America.



Q: Did Dimetrodon have sharp claws?
from Rosey I, Hunter, NY, USA; February 27, 2000

A: Yes, Dimetrodon had sharp claws on its four feet.



Q: Isn't the littlest dinosaur a mosaurus? [ by the way i dont know how to spell it.]
from Marain O., Wilton, CT, USA; February 27, 2000

A: Mussarus is tiny (16 inches long 37 cm), but is a only a hatchling, not an adult specimen. No one knows how big an adult would grow to be.



Q: Did the little bumps on the snout and behind the dome of Pachycephalosaurus have a purpose? Did they support horns (like on Stygimoloch.)? I am also curious about you response to my sauropod skull question. One of my books, DINOSAUR! (based on the tv documentary) by David Norman says that the Brachiosaurus' skull was 3 feet or 0.9 metres long, which is bigger than your Nemegtosaurus. What was your source? PS. Anybody know how big that Argentinosaurus skull was (there's a picture of it in the Dec. 1997 National Geographic, and it looks kind of low and small.)?
from Brad M., Woodville, Ontario, Canada; February 27, 2000

A: My reference for that answer was the book, "The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs" by David E. Fastovsky and David B. Weishempel, Cambridge University Press, 1996. They may have been presenting an average skull size (they don't say). I'll check out the Norman book.

I don't have figures on Argentinosaurus, and I've never seen any definitive explanation for Pachycephalosaurus' bumps.



Q: I am doing a report and was wondering what type of fossils have been found in New York State? They can be dinosaur fossils or any other type of fossils. If you do not have an answer to this question, will you suggest a few websites that may help? Thank you.
from Jana, NY, USA; February 27, 2000

A: There have been no dinosaurs found in New York State (yet). For a page of dinosaurs fossils found in each state of the USA (and the official sate fossil of each state), click here.



Q: What is the suborder of the Protoceratops?
from Annie S., W. Milford, NJ, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Protoceratops belong to the suborder ceratospia - frilled dinosaurs.



Q: In what periods did the dinosaurs live(how did you name it)?
from DARREN, CP. WC; February 26, 2000

A: They lived during the Mesozoic Era, which is divided into theTriassic period, the Jurassic period, and the Cretaceous period.



Q: I am in the 8th grade, doing a report on the Hadrosaurus. These are a few questions I have not been able to find an answer for. What were the main enemies of the Hadroaurus? What are the similarities between the Hadrosaurus and creatures today? How long did they live for? How did they treat their young. If you could answer any of these questions A.S.A.P it would be a great help to me. Thanks
from Elliot G., West Orange, New Jersey, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Very little is known about Hadrosaurus, since only a very incomplete skeleton was found. This duckbilled dinosaur dates from the late Cretacesou period and lived in what is now North America. It was probably eaten by any of a number of theropods, perhaps Diplotomodon or Dryptosaurus. For other dinosaurs that lived during the late Cretaceous, click here. For the similarities between Hadrosaurus and modern-day animals, you'll have to read the entry on Hadrosaurus and draw your own conclusions. There is no fossil evidence on how Hadrosaurus cared for its young.



Q: Can you give me the nickname of the Ankylosaurus?
from Becky H., West Milford, New Jersey, USA; February 26, 2000

A: I've never heard of a nickname for Ankylosaurus, but the name ankylosaurus means "Fused Lizard," because many of its bones were fused together



Q: Hi- I need to find a dinosaur that lived in the triassic period can you please tell me where on this website i can find one with info. about it? Thank you very much!
from Melissa T., Miami, FL, USA; February 26, 2000

A: For Triassic dinosaurs, click here.



Q: How do you know what the skin color looked liked or how the skin felt.
from Vincenz F., Bronx, NY, USA; February 26, 2000

A: No one knows what color any of the dinosaurs were, but many fossilized skin impressions have been found. For example, T. rex skin had a "pebbled" texture. For more information , click here.



Q: I am doing a report on the Pachycephalosaurus and have a few questions. What color was the Pachycephalosaurus? Where were the fossils found of the Pachycephalosaurus? Who, when, and where were the fossils discovered. What was their habitat and environment like? What kinds of plants did they eat? What ate them? What order, suborder, family, species, and genus was it in? THANKS FOR ALL YOUR HELP!
from NAME, CITYSTATE, USA; February 26, 2000

A: For information on Pachycephalosaurus, click here. No one knows what color any of the dinosaurs were.



Q: What do you know about dinosaur DNA?
from Brian S. Cape May, New Jersey, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Unfortunately, no dinosaur DNA has been found (yet).



Q: What are some similar genera of diplodocus?
from ?; February 26, 2000

A: Diplodocus was a diplodocid sauropod, a group of huge, whip-tailed plant-eating dinosaurs. Other diplodocids included Apatosaurus, Supersaurus, Seismosaurus, Barosaurus, Dystylosaurus, Dystrophaeus, Dinheirosaurus, Dyslocosaurus, and many others not found yet.



Q: What kinds of dinosaurs lived in the Cretaceous Period?
from Marcie V., Lubbock, TX, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Many kinds of dinosaurs lived during the Cretaceous period, including T. rex, Triceratops, etc. For a list of early Cretaceous dinosaurs, click here. For a list of middle Cretaceous dinosaurs, click here. For a list of late Cretaceous dinosaurs, click here.



Q: what caused the extinction of the protoceratops and the diplodocus?
from SAMANTHA, CUMBERLAND, RI, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Protoceratops went extinct during the K-T extinction 65 million years ago. Diplodocus lived much earlier, during the late Jurassic period. Diplodocus went extinct about 145 million years ago - during a smaller mass extinction which marked the end of the Jurassic.



Q: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DINOSAURS OF THE SIMILAR SPECIES OF PROTOSERATOPS? THIS IS A ? FOR A 7TH GRADE REPORT DUE FEB.28
from SAMANTHA, CUMBERLAND, RI, USA; February 26, 2000

A: Protoceratops is a genus of dinosaurs, not a species. It belonged to the group of dinosaurs called ceratopsians, that included many genera (the plural of genus), including Triceratops, Pentaceratops, Montanoceratops, Monoclonius, Styracosaurus, Zuniceratops, and many others. Ceratopsians were quadrupedal plant-eaters who had a beak, a bony neck frill, and horns.



Q: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DINOSAURS [NAMES] IN THE PROTOCERATOPS TIME?
from SAMANTHA; February 26, 2000

A: Protoceratops lived during the late Cretaceous period (about 72 to 65 million years ago) in what is now Mongolia, Asia. For a list of other dinosaurs that lived in Asia during that time, click here and scroll down to the orange section (Asian dinosaurs form the late Cretaceous period).



Q: Which sauropod had the biggest head (Not in relation to body size or anything, just the actual measurement.)?
from Brad M., Woodville, Ontario, Canada; February 25, 2000

A: I'm not sure which is the biggest, but Nemegtosaurus' skull was about 20 inches (50 cm) long, which is longer than the skulls of Brachiosaurus, Lufengosaurus, Diplodocus, Shunsaurus, Anchisaurus, Cooloradisaurus, or Yunnanosaurus. Unfortunately, skulls haven't been found for many sauropods.



Q: Have any dinosaurs (Triceratops) ever been found around or in the Follansbee, WV area. This is in the northern panhandle of WV between Ohio & Pennsylvania? This if for a Third Grade project. Thank You
from Gayle R., Wellburg, WV, USA; February 25, 2000

A: No dinosaurs have been found (yet) in West Virginia. For a page on where dinosaurs have been found, state by state, click here.



Q: Do you have any pictures or information on a megladon. I saw a show on tv about them. All I know is that they think they are huge prehistoric sharks.
from Charlie M., Troy, MI, USA; February 25, 2000

A: For a page on Megalodon, click here.



Q: Please answer this quickly!!!!! how did the Ichthyosaurus get its name?? i really need to know this. and i cant find any information about it. please ehelp me
from Capricorn S, balt, md, USA; February 25, 2000

A: Ichthyosaurus, which means "fish lizard," was named by Charles Koenig in 1818. For more information on Ichthyosaurus, click here.



Q: I am in first grade and am doing a report on carnivores. I decided to do it on theropods since dinos are the coolest and i am going to be a paleontlogist. I am looking for a short, complete definition of a theropod. Can you help. thanks, Noah P.S. see you in about 13 years.
from Noah D., Howell. MI, USA; February 25, 2000

A: Theropods are a suborder of saurischian dinosaurs. They were fast-moving, bipedal carnivores (meat-eaters) with grasping hands and clawed digits. Theropods lived from the mid-Triassic period until the end of the Cretaceous period. The word theropod means "beast-footed".



Q: can you get more information on the plesiosaur
from Jessica C, Cache, Oklahoma, USA; February 25, 2000

A: For a page on Plesiosaurus, click here. For a page on plesiosaurs in general, click here.



Q: DO DINOS LAY EGGS?
from ?; February 25, 2000

A: Many fossilized dinosaur eggs have been found.



Q: How are fossils made? How does bone turn to stone? How are fossilized bone brought to the surface? What is a Fossil?
from Nick B.; February 25, 2000

A: Click here to read about how fossils form. They are sometimes brought to the surface with erosion (from winds, rain, etc.). For what a fossil is, click here.



Q: What is meant by by the shifting earth? What's the difference between the triassic, Jurassic and cretaceous continents?
from Nick B.; February 25, 2000

A: The Earth's continents are slowly drifting atop the Earth's mantle. For information on continental drift and pictures of the continents through the ages, click here.



Q: how are rocks removed from the fossils?
from bodnarina h, st. albert, ?; February 25, 2000

A: Very, very carefully. Dental tools are used in the later stages of rock removal to avoid damaging the fossil specimen.



Q: What kind of tools do they need to dig up a dinosaur?
from Alanna S., Alberta, Canada; February 25, 2000

A: Click here for information on excavating fossils.



Q: Why does T-rex have a better advantage over other meat-eaters?
from Jon M., New York City, New York, USA; February 25, 2000

A: Mostly because T. rex was bigger that any of its contemporaries. It was also smarter than many, but not all.



Q: DO YOU HAVE ANY PICTURES OF LESOTHOSAURUS'S?
from AMANDA H, NEWMANSTOWN, PA, USA; February 25, 2000

A: For a small drawing of Lesothosaurus and information about it, click here.



Q: Ok, I've asked some weird questions in the past, but this one is relatively normal. What's the status of the Oviraptor skull with the horn on its nose? Do they now think it is a female Oviraptor, or a different species from the one with the cassowary crest, or was it simply based on a damaged skull with the crest broken off? The reason I asked weird questions is I'd like to someday publish a book on dinosaurs and would like them as accurate as possible. (Which is impossible in itself.)
from Mary N., Georgia, VT, USA; February 24, 2000

A: Oviraptor philoceratops (which was found with a crushed skull in southern Mongolia in 1923 by George Olsen) had a small, horn-like projection at the tip of the snout (that looks like it was broken, but may have actually looked that way). This projection may have been part of the bony nasal crest or may have been a horn. There isn't a definitive answer to this question. Good luck with the book!



Q: How did T-Rex get its name?
from Alex Y., Apex, NC, USA; February 24, 2000

A: Tyrannosaurus rex was named by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1905. For more information on naming T. rex, click here.



Q: what happenend with that wooley mamouth they found frozen and were going to breed with an elephant?
from Bill R., Aloha, OR, USA; February 24, 2000

A: They're still working on it. There's going to a Discovery channel show on it in March. For more information on Woolly Mammoths, click here.



Q: HOW BIG IS THE PLESIOSAURUS?
from JESSICA C, CACHE, OKLAHOMA, USA; February 24, 2000

A: Plesiosaurus was about 7.6 feet (2.3 m) long. For more information on Plesiosaurus and other plesiosaurs, click here.



Q: Did dinosaurs have a crop ( a bunch of stones at the base of the throat for grinding food)???
from Paul, Chambersburg, PA, USA; February 24, 2000

A: Some dinosaurs had a gizzard, a muscular, often pebble-filled pouch in the stomach that helps grind up food. Gastroliths (gizzard stones) have been found in many dinosaur fossils. The crop is a pouch in the throat where food can be temporarily stored and preliminary food breakdown happens, but I it doesn't contain stones.



Q: I heard there whas found a new dinosaur. I heard it was the biggest one they ever found (50m). I must to know if it's true.
from Jeroen r., Zwevegem(kortrijk), West-vlaanderen, Belgium; February 24, 2000

A: For information on this recent gigantic dinosaur find from Argentina, click here.



Q: What was the ceneozic era?
from Nick B.; February 24, 2000

A: The Cenozoic Era is the span of geologic time from 65 million years ago until now. It is sometimes calld the "Age of Mammals." For a chart of geologic time, click here.



Q: what does the word fossil mean in Latin? what determines a fossil's color?
from School, Bitburg, Germany; February 24, 2000

A: Fossil comes from the Latin word "fodere," which means "to dig." What determines a fossil's color is the composition of the minerals that formed it.



Q: WERE DINOSAURS MOSTLY HERBIVORES OR CARNIVORES?
from KRISTEN, DELRAN, NJ, USA; February 24, 2000

A: THere were many more herbivores than carnivores. For more information on dinosaur diets, click here.



Q: Which dinosaurs had blood pressure problums?
from Chris G., Havana, Illinois, USA; February 24, 2000

A: The giant, long-necked sauropods had to have high blood pressure in order to pump blood up the long neck to the brain.



Q: Why don't dinosaurs have ears?
from Matthew L.. Clearwater, FL, USA; February 23, 2000

A: They did, they just didn't have external ear structures (like we do). Externally, there was just a small hole (like that of birds).



Q: would like to know names of flying dinosaurs
from larry a., augusta, ga, USA; February 23, 2000

A: Pterosaurs were flying reptiles that lived during the tme of the dinosaurs. For information on Pterosaurs, click here. There were no flying dinosaurs (excluding the birds).



Q: fIND OUT WHAT TIME PERIOD AND IN WHAT KIND OF ENVIRONMENT THE ICTHYOSAURS LIVED IN. EXPLAIN HOW YOU CAN TELL WHEN AND WHERE THE ICTHYOSAURS LIVED FROM THEIR FOSSIL REMAINS
from MARIANNE F, CHICAGO, IL, USA; February 23, 2000

A: For info on Ichthyosaurs, click here. There are many ways to determine how old a fossil is; for info on this topic, click here. Ancient animals lived at or near where their fossils were found.



Q: what is the scientific name for allosaurus and stegasaurus?
from josh, mayville, nd, USA; February 23, 2000

A: Allosaurus and Stegosaurus are the scientific names (the genus) of those dinosaurs. Unlike most other animals, dinosaurs are known by their scientific name.



Q: What does the Pterodactyls use for self-defense?
from ?; February 23, 2000

A: The only defense of the many Pterodactlys was their pointed jaws and small finger claws. Some had teeth (like Rhamphorhynchus), but others did not (like Quetzalcoatlus). Flying away was probably their best defense. For more information on Pterodactyls, click here.



Q: What did Camptosaurus weigh?
from ?; February 23, 2000

A: Camptosaurus weighed about 2200 pounds (1000 kg). For more information on Camptosaurus, click here.



Q: what is another name for apatosaurus? how long was apatosaurus?
from ashley w, san marcos, texas, USA; February 23, 2000

A: Brontosaurus is an older name for Apatosaurus, which is about 70-95 feet long (21-29 m). For more information on this giant dinosaurs, click here.



Q: i know t-rex and gigatusours could not have meet, but if they did who would win?
from joshua t., humble, tx, USA; February 23, 2000

A: Probably T. rex, because it was much smarter (it had a much bigger brain) that Giganotosaurus.



Q: My second grade class is doing research on pteradactyl, or is it spelled teradactyl without the silent 'p', and what did it eat, and how long ago did it live? Did it fly? Did it lay eggs? Thank you.
from Rachel B, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; February 22, 2000

A: For a page on Pterodactyls (with a silent P), click here. There were many different types of Pterodactyls. They all flew, ate meat, and laid eggs. (p.s., your e-mail address didn't work)



Q: when where the dinosaurs first here?
from ?; February 22, 2000

A: The earliest dinosaurs date from about 230 million years ago (during the mid Triassic period).



Q: How did different dinosaurs adapt to different environment thoughout the world and during different periods? Please give examples.
from joshua R, Houston, TX, USA; February 22, 2000

A: This sounds suspiciously like a homework question. To answer it, pick two vastly different dinosaurs, like Massospondylus (an early, medium-sized plant-eater from a desert-like environment in the Triassic period) and T. rex (a huge meat-eater which lived in the cooler late Cretaceous period). Or choose dinosaurs like Baryonyx, which ate fish (with sharp teeth) and lived near rivers during the early Jurassic period or a giant sauropod liek Brachiosaurus which had a long neck, presumably eat the tops of tall trees.



Q: Did the Stegosaurus have a nickname?
from Allison C., Cornell, Illinois, USA; February 22, 2000

A: It soesn't have a nickname in everyday English, but there was a Stegosaur in the children's cartoon movie Land Before Time, and I don't remenber if it had a nickname there.



Q: WHAT WAS THE FIRST DINOSAUR FOSSIL FOUND
from l d, pawtucket, RI, USA; February 22, 2000

A: Click here for the first dinosaur finds.



Q: who invented the term dinosaur?
from jasyn w, orange, ca, USA; February 22, 2000

A: See the faq above.



Q: What types of animals were in the Cenozic Era.
from Ashley, Port Deposit, USA; February 22, 2000

A: The Cenozoic Era lasted from 65 million years ago until today. Some Cenozoic animals include us (and everything else alive today), and all the organisls that have lived on Earth since the time immediately following the K-T extinction 65 million years ago. A sampling of these animals includes smilodon, mammoths, Basilosaurus (a primitive whale), and many more. For more detailed information on these and other geologic eras, click here.



Q: In the Precambrian Era,what are some specific names of the animals?
from Heather, M.D., USA; February 22, 2000

A: What used to be called the Precambrian (before roughly 540 million year ago) has now been broken up into different eons,
•The Proterozoic Eon (540 million years ago to 2.5 billion year ago) when the first multicellular life (like sponges) appeared
•The Archeozoic Eon (2.5 - 3.9 billion year ago) (when blue-green algae and bacteria evolved)
•The Hadean Eon, before life evolved on Earth.

For more detailed information on these and other geologic eras, click here.



Q: I want only information about the Maiasaura Dinosaur.
from Danielle m, mayville, N.D., USA; February 22, 2000

A: For info on Maiasaura, click here.



Q: Where can I find information on the Tyrannosaurus rexes habitat.I am doing a report for my second grade class.
from Andrew, Cary, NC, USA; February 21, 2000

A: Tyrannosaurus rex probably lived in forests, where its prey (plant-eating dinosaus) could find plenty of food. For a lot more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: I am doing a report on the diplodocus and I need to know when they became extinct.
from Kelly D., Humble, Texas, USA; February 21, 2000

A: Diplodocus went extinct roughly 145 million years ago. For more information on Diplodocus, click here.



Q: What adaptations do animals in the rainforest have?
from Amanda M., Snellville, GA, USA; February 20, 2000

A: Click here for a page on rainforest animal adaptations.



Q: Could you please give me some info on where current Diplodocus fossils are located?
from erin s.; February 20, 2000

A: There are (or were, museums often change what is on view) Diplodocus on display at: Denver Museum of Natural History, Denver, CO; Pratt Museum, Amherst, MA; Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, Houston, TX; Institute and Museum for Geology and Paleontology, Tübingen, Germany; National Museum of Natural History, Paris, France; G. Capellini Museum, Bologna, Italy; The Natural History Museum, London, England; Central Geological and Prospecting Museum, Leningrad, Russia; Museum of La Plata University, La Plata, Argentina; and probably others.



Q: What was the earth like at that time?
from Nancilyn S., East Hanover, NJ, USA; February 20, 2000

A: For information on the climate during the Mesozoic Era, click here.



Q: could gigatusoris kill rex in a fight?
from jt, humble, texas, USA; February 20, 2000

A: They never could have met, since they lived millions of years apart in time and on different continents. For more information on T. rex, click here. For more information on Giganotosaurus, click here.



Q: Could you please tell me the authors for the subjects jurassic period and diplodocus?
from erin s., cumb., r.i., USA; February 20, 2000

A: Jeananda Col



Q: What did Pangaea look like?
from ?; February 19, 2000

A: For information on Pangaea, click here.



Q: how many teeth did the gigantusorse have(and how sharp were they)?
from jt, humble, tx, USA; February 18, 2000

A: Giganotosaurus has roughly 66, sharp, knife-like, serrated teeth. For more information on Giganotosaurus, click here.



Q: Whats your name?
from Kate; February 18, 2000

A: Jeananda Col



Q: Who do Palontigist work for?
from Corinne G., Sidney, Ohio, USA; February 18, 2000

A: Most work for universities; some work for museums.



Q: What is the height of Brachycertops?
from Natevis T., Martinsville, Virginia, USA; February 18, 2000

A: Brachyceratops was about 2 3/4 feet tall at the shoulder and about 6 feet long. For more information on Brachyceratops, click here.



Q: Who invented the term dinosaur?
from Dustin Y., Orange, CA, USA; February 18, 2000

A: Richard Owen. For more information on naming dinosaurs, click here.



Q: Where would I be able to find information on the most recent dinosaur and ancient man dincoveries, world wide?
from Neysa W., Mt.Robson, B.C., Canada; February 18, 2000

A: Online, we have a section on recent discoveries. Also, CNN and other news companies sometimes have paleontology news (but these news agencies often have mistakes in their science reports). Off line, the magazines Nature, Science, National Geographic, and Science News are excellent sources (you can probably get them in your library).



Q: How did the T Rex reproduce?
from Alexandra S., Locust Valley, New York, USA; February 18, 2000

A: No one knows how T. rex reproduces, other than that it hatched from eggs. For more information on T. rex click here.



Q: What dinosaurs lived in Africa?
from ?; February 18, 2000

A: Many, many dinosaur fossils have been found in Africa. For a page on fossil finds in Africa, click here.



Q: When was the first dinosaur fossil discovered and where was it discovered at? Define the word deinos.
from Mallory B, Martinsville, Virginia, USA; February 18, 2000

A: Click here for a page on the first fossil finds. Deinos menas terrifying. For more information on the name dinosaur, click here.



Q: were there any dinosaurs discovered in virginia? what does sauros mean?
from Cordelia M., Martinsville, Virginia, USA; February 18, 2000

A: No. For a page on fossil finds, state by state, click here. Sauros means lizard.



Q: which dinosaur had the most teeth? Which dinosaurs had blood pressure problems?
from Kori F., Havana, IL, USA; February 17, 2000

A: Hadrosaurs had the most teeth. For more information on dinosaur teeth, click here. I answered this qestion yesterday - scroll down.



Q: I am in second grade and I am doing a dino-report. How long are the FLIPPERS of a plesiosaurus and about how much did it weigh? This info is not in the dino dictionary. thanks!
from Tommy W., Lima, NY, USA; February 17, 2000

A: I've never seen a reliable weight estimate for Plesiosaurus. The back flippers were just under 2 feet long; the front flippers were slightly shorter.



Q: what is used to measure a dinosaurs intelligence i need to know
from te k, havana, il, USA; February 17, 2000

A: EQ. For information on this measure of intelligence, click here.



Q: What is Protoceratops's weight?
from Andy S., Coralville, Iowa, USA; February 17, 2000

A: Protoceratops weighed up to about 900 pounds (400 kg). For more information on Protoceratops click here.



Q: What kind of dinosaur spits at its prey? it was in Jurrasic park.
from Jared S.; February 17, 2000

A: In the movie Jurassic Park, they gave Dilophosaurus the ability to spit poison, but there is no fossil evidence to support this. All we know is that it was a meat-eater.



Q: Which dinosaurs had blood pressure problems?
from Kori F., Havana, IL, USA; February 16, 2000

A: Some of the largest sauropods (like Brachiosaurus) had to have powerful circulatory systems that were able to pump blood up the long neck and on to the head and brain.



Q: What should I do for my scool report
from ?; February 16, 2000

A: If you have to write a report on a dinosaur, see this page.



Q: What was the density of population of t-rex and perhaps of dinosaurs in general. Given the continental u.s. , what would have been average numbers?
from jimmy r., plainfield, il, USA; February 16, 2000

A: This is a question that a lot of people would like to know the answer to, but no one knows how to figure out the answer to this yet. All we know is how many fossils have been found, and not how many fossils there are, and what percentage of an average population fossilizes (which probably varies videly from species to species).



Q: You haven't answered a SINGLE question during the past week.
from Jimmy L., Georgia, USA; February 16, 2000

A: Yes I have, you're probably going to a our old numerical IP address (instead of using our domain name, www.ZoomDinosaurs.com). Every machine on the Internet has a numerical IP (Internet protocol) address, and we transferred all our files onto a new machine (which has a different IP number), so you're not getting anything new, like our new contest, which I thought you would win, but didn't! I'll upload this file to our old machine so you see this.



Q: We have to cite your internet source for a special computer class. Could you give us some information about your site's authors, place of publication, and Universal Resource Locator? It's not a dinosaur question, but important to us!
from Bridgette B., North Royalton, Ohio, USA; February 16, 2000

A: The author of Zoom Dinosaurs is Jeananda Col and it is published by EnchantedLearning.com of Washington, USA

The Universal Resource Locator (usually abbreviated URL) is simply the web address of the page you're citing.



Q: What did a spinasorous look like?
from Sean R, Lawton, Michigan, USA; February 16, 2000

A: Click here for a drawing and information on Spinosaurus.



Q: where did the word jurrassic come from?
from gerald, norfolk, va, USA; February 16, 2000

A: The Jurassic period is named for old rock strata found in the Jura Mountains, which are located between France and Switzerland.



Q: how do dimetrodons reproduce ?
from CRYSTAL F, Oshkosh, WI, USA; February 16, 2000

A: No one knows how Dimetrodon reproduced. It probably laid eggs (it was an amniote), but that's about all anyone knows. For more information on Dimetrodon, click here.



Q: From Maine where can the nearest dinosaur fossils be found?
from ?; February 16, 2000

A: Many dinosaur fossils have been found in Nova Scotia Canada and Massachusetts. For a list of dinosaur fossil locations, click here.



Q: Find out where Coelopysis lived and when?
from NAME, Havanna, USA; February 16, 2000

A: For information on Coelophysis, click here.



Q: how many of the world's creatures are extinct?
from Catherine B, Notingham, England; February 16, 2000

A: Scientists estimate that well over 95 percent of all the species that ever existed are extinct. The vast majority of the extinctions occurred long before humans even existed.



Q: What is a fossil?
from sobia c, Notingham, East Midlands, England; February 16, 2000

A: Click here.



Q: was an ankylosaurus cold blooded or warm blooded?
from ?; February 15, 2000

A: No one knows. For more information on whether dinosaurs were cold or hot-blooded, click here.



Q: what is the scientific name for triceratop?
from Farris P., Fremont, CA, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Unlike most other animals, dinosaurs are known by their scientific name (their genus). For example, the genus of Triceratops is Triceratops. There is some disagreement about how many species of Triceratops have been found. Some paleontologists (notably Ostrom and Welnhoffer, 1990) believe there is one species, Triceratops horridus. Others believe that there are two (C. Forster, 1996) or more species, including: Triceratops horridus, Triceratops prorsus, Triceratops albertensis, Triceratops ingens, Triceratops alticornis, and perhaps others.



Q: why did the paleozoic era die?
from carole w, tallahassee, fl, USA; February 15, 2000

A: The Paleozoic Era ended with a huge mass extinction (the Permian extinction) - the biggest in the history of the Earth.



Q: What kind of egg did a pachycephalosaurus have? What species is the pachycephalosaurus?
from Stephanie, Pawtucket, RI, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Pachycephalosaurus is a genus of dinosaurs; the type species is P. wyomingensis. I've never heard of any Pachycephalosaurus egg finds. For more info on Pachycephalosaurus, click here.



Q: Why did the Platybelodon become extinct?
from Gary G., New Rochelle, NY, USA; February 15, 2000

A: There was a mass extinction at the end of the Miocene, in which many animals, including Platybelodon, went extinct, perhaps because of changes in the weather.



Q: How did a lesothosaur dinosaur get its name?
from ?; February 15, 2000

A: The dinosaur Lesothosaurus was named for its fossils' location. Its name means Lesotho lizard; its fossils were found in Lesotho, South Africa. For more info on Lesothosauurs, click here.



Q: I have read that the "Mammal-like reptiles" were not reptiles at all. This is fine, but what are they then? This leaves too much unexplained.
- were they amphibians?
- were they mammals?
- did they fit into any class? They should, but since this is a relatively new classification I can see how they may not.
- have mammals and proto-mammals been put into a new class together (Synapsida)
- did the synapsids evolve from reptiles? This would make sense to me, since I would assume the eggs of the platypus are hard-shelled. Even in non-egg-laying mammals, there are some hints of a reptilian egg in our distant past. I know this is zoomdinosaurs, but I couldn't find zoomprotomammals. Please help!

from Brad M., Woodville, Ontario, Canada; February 15, 2000

A: The so-called "mammal-like reptiles," or pelycosaurs (like Dimetrodon) were early synapsids. The name "mammal-like reptiles" is a misnomer for this group that split off from reptiles about 320 million years ago. They were not amphibians, but they were ancestors of mammals.




Q: can you tell me things about ornithosuchus and pachycephalosaurus?
from ?; February 15, 2000

A: For information on Pachycephalosaurus, click here.For information on Ornithosuchus, click here.



Q: what is the name of a carnivore dinosaur
from ?; February 15, 2000

A: The theropods were carnivorous dinosaurs.



Q: What is the name of the major extinction that preceded the Mesozoic Era/
from Marina M., Tipton, Oklahoma, USA; February 15, 2000

A: The Permian mass extinction preceded the Mesozoic Era. The Permian extinction was the biggest mass extinction that ever occured on Earth.



Q: Please tell me how much the archaeopteryx weighed. Did it fly or glide?
from Brandon H., Hebron, IL, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Archaeopteryx was about the size of a crow and perhaps roughly the same weight, about 18 ounces (500 grams). It may have been able to fly, but not very far and not very well. For more information on Archaeopteryx, click here.



Q: Why did the dinosaurs fight?
from Heidi S., Travis M., Patrick A ., Jozi M.,, Parkersburg, WV, USA; February 15, 2000

A: No one knows if dinosaurs did fight. Animals generally fight for territory, food, mates, or for a primary position in a group.



Q: How did the dinosaurs survive in the cold?
from Paul M., Caleb H., Clifford S., Parkersburg, WV, USA; February 15, 2000


Earth about 65 million years ago.
A: During the Mesozoic period, when dinosaurs lived, the climate was warmer than it is now. Also, the continents were jammed together into a supercontinent (called Pangaea) that was located near the equator (even the continent of Antarctica was relatively warm). If there were any relatively cold area, dinosaurs could have migrated to warmed areas seasonally (although there wasn't much seasonality during the Mesozoic Era).



Q: What distinguishing or unusual features does an allosaurus have?
from Amber M., Tell City, , IN, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Allosaurus was a large, very common, meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Jurassic period, about 154-144 million years ago. Its vertebrae (backbones) were different from those of other dinosaurs. For more information on Allosaurus, click here.



Q: Hi, please help me...i am doing a project on dinosaurs, and i am desperate to know how long did the dinosaurs live for???? i been looking everywhere for the info, but just can't find it.
from Shelley A., Sydney, NSW, Australia; February 15, 2000

A: The dinosaurs lived from about 230 million years ago until 65 million years ago, during the Mesozoic Era.



Q: Why did the Triceratops have rough skin?
from Shelby P., Brittany S., Zachary S, Parkersburg, WV, USA; February 15, 2000

A: It was probably afforded the Triceratops some protection from predators, although skin texture probably didn't deter dinosaurs like T. rex.



Q: Have they ever found fossils of dinosaur skin?
from Ethan M., Dustin B., Ryan D., Parkersburg, WV, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Yes, many fossilized impressions of dinosaur skin have been found. For more information on dinosaur skin, click here.



Q: What is the weight of Ornithomimus?
from Torey B and Amanda T. and Deontae, Coralville, IA, USA; February 15, 2000

A: Ornithomimus weighed about 380 pounds (175 kg).



Q: What types of animals lived in Paleozic Era?
from NAME, CITYSTATE, USA; February 15, 2000

A: The Paleozic Era lasted from 540 to 248 million years ago. During the Paleozic Era, all the major groups of animals evolved, including invertebrates (like sponges, trilobites, corals, and insects), fish, amphibians, and early reptiles. The last part of the Paleozic Era was the ermian period (for some Permian animals, click here). After the Paleozic Era came the Mesozoic Era, when the dinosaurs and mammals appeared. For a chart of geologic time, click here.



Q: animal bigger than a dinosaur
from ?; February 15, 2000

A: The blue whale is bigger than any of the dinosaurs were.



Q: What evidence do we have today that proves dinosaurs did exist?
from Catherine S., Sydney, NSW, Australia; February 14, 2000

A: Tons and tons of fossilized bones, eggs, trackways, and other fossils.



Q: Could you tell me an interesting fact about T.Rex?
from Shea W., Elsmere, KY, USA; February 14, 2000

A: Click here for information on T. rex.



Q: When and where was the first saber tooth tiger fossil discovered?
from Cheryl, Colorado Springs, CO, USA; February 14, 2000

A: Smilodon was first named and scinetifically described in 1846 by Plieninger (fossil found in Europe).



Q: In what year and where was the first dinosaur bone discovered?
from Elliot, Colorado Springs, CO, USA; February 14, 2000

A: Click here for the first dinosaur discoveries.



Q: When and where was the first wooly mammoth fossil discovered?
from Eli, Colorado Springs, CO, USA; February 14, 2000

A: One of the earliest accounts of a mammoth find was written in 1724, by Dr. Daniel Gottlieb Messerschmidt, (a naturalist). He described a Siberian mammoth.



Q: Where can I find a Brachiosaurus skeleton? (picture)
from ?; February 14, 2000

A: Click here for a Brachiosaurus skeleton, or here for a Brachiosaurus skeleton printout.



Q: What is stegoceras weight?
from Gregory R., Coralville, IA, USA; February 14, 2000

A: Stegoceras weighed roughly 170 pounds (78 kg). For more information on Stegoceras, click here.



Q: I want to know if dinosaurs had salt glands. Why or why not?
from Maria H., Seattle, WA; February 13, 2000

A: Some birds and reptiles (like albatrosses, pelicans and some crocodilians) have salt glands. These glands excrete excess salt from the body. Salt glands (which are modified tear glands) are located just above a bird's eye. These glands let marine birds to drink salty seawater (most animals, including people, cannot drink salt water). No one knows if dinosaurs had salt glands.



Q: how many babies did the T-REX have at once?
from ?; February 13, 2000

A: No one knows anything about T. rex reproduciton; neither eggs nor nests have been found yet. For information on T. rex, click here.



Q: can I see a picture of an example of where a dinosaur lived? a picture of their enviornment of habitat.
from Susan A., Abilene, Texas, USA; February 13, 2000

A: Click here.



Q: is there any detail pictures of the dino Yangchanosaurus?
from R.J. S, Vineland, New Jersey, USA; February 13, 2000

A: For a page on Yangchuanosaurus, click here. There's a reconstructed head at: http://dinosaur.umbc.edu/images/yangchuanosaurus-head-ms.html and a aerial view at: http://dinosaur.umbc.edu/images/shunosaurus-yangchuanosaurus-nd.html



Q: what is the scientific name for triceratops
from ?; February 13, 2000

A: Unlike most other animals, dinosaurs are known by their scientific name (their genus). For example, the genus of Triceratops is Triceratops. There is some disagreement about how many species of Triceratops have been found. Some paleontologists (notably Ostrom and Welnhoffer, 1990) believe there is one species, Triceratops horridus. Others believe that there are two (C. Forster, 1996) or more species, including: Triceratops horridus, Triceratops prorsus, Triceratops albertensis, Triceratops ingens, Triceratops alticornis, and perhaps others.



Q: Who were the Alamosaurus? Where were they found? How were they like? What do they eat? How do they look like? What is interesting about the Alamosaurus? Who do they get along with?
from Lan N, Houston, TX, USA; February 13, 2000

A: For information on Alamosaurus, click here. For a printout on Alamosaurus, click here.



Q: Could you please tell me how tall the Ankylosaurus was.
from Cody S., Clarkrange, Tennessee, USA; February 13, 2000

A: Ankylosaurus was about 4 feet (1.2 m) tall. For more information on Ankylosaurus, click here.



Q: What is a Dunkleosteus? Was it a predator? When did it live?
from Heather B., Denison, TX, USA; February 13, 2000

A: Dunkleosteus was an ancient, predatory fish from the late Devonian period, about 400 million years ago. For more information on Dunkleosteus click here.



Q: What was the status of pangea when parasaurolophus lived?
from Billy H., houston, TX, USA; February 13, 2000


Earth about 65 million years ago.
A: Parasaurolophus lived during the late Cretaceous period, about 76-65 Million years ago, when Pangaea was breaking up. For more information on Parasaurolophus, click here.



Q: did man and dinosaurs co-exists?
from Becky K., Ashland, MT, USA; February 13, 2000

A: No



Q: Were there any poisionous dinosaurs? If so please give names
from Nicole S., Martins Ferry, Ohio, USA; February 12, 2000

A: No one knows if any dinosaurs were poisonous or venomous. They may have been, but poisons are not preserved in the fossil record.



Q: How do we know that dinosaurs reared thier babies?
from Malcolm A., Swieqi, Malta; February 12, 2000

A: For most dinosaurs, we do not know if they cared for their young, because no fossil evidence has been found. For the dinosaur Maiasaura, areas have been excavated in which many nests, eggs, hatchlings, juveniles, and adults were found. This bonebed evidence indicates that Maiasaura built nests and stayed with their hatchlings until they could care for themselves. For more information on Maiasaura, click here.



Q: What is the dinosaur that has the Greek name of roofed lizard ?
from ?; February 11, 2000

A: Stegosaurus.



Q: how many eggs did the apatosaurus lay in one nest?
from kentrell W, Mobile, AL, USA; February 10, 2000

A: No Apatosaurus nests have been found. Giant sauropod eggs have been found in lines, as though the dinosaur laid them while walking. For information on Apatosaurus, click here.



Q: IM DOING A REPORT ON ANKLYOSAURUS AND I HAVE NO INTERESTING INFORMATION,PLEASE HELP !!!
from scot d., gainesville, missouri, USA; February 10, 2000

A: One really interesting (?) part is about how it may have had a lot of gas from eating the way it did. For information on Ankylosaurus, click here.



Q: how long in lenth is the brachiasaurus, antarcticsauraus, baronyx, mimni, kakuru, and albertasaurus?
from Meleigha H. and Ali P., Hot Springs, AK, USA; February 10, 2000

A: You can look them up in the dinosaur dictionary.



Q: Where do the Torosaurus dinosaur live?How? How do they look? What do they eat? How do they get it? What about babies? Whate are some other facts about it?
from cindy t., sugarland, texas, USA; February 9, 2000

A: No one knows about their reproduction of if they cared for their hatchlings. For information on Torosaurus, click here.



Q: WHAT IS THE INTELLIGENCE OF THE DINOSAUR ALBERTOSAURS?
from R.T., ST.LOUIS . MO., USA; February 10, 2000

A: Albertosaurus was a theropod, a relatively smart dinosaur.

EQ




Q: How did ornithosuchus live? How did they eat? How did they survive
from Mabel L, Marathon, TX, USA; February 10, 2000

A: For information on Ornithosuchus, click here.



Q: Do you have information about the geosaurus?
from B.B., Macon, GA, USA; February 10, 2000

A: For information on Geosaurus, click here.



Q: I am in first grade.I need to learn more about stegosaurus.I need to know: its favorite foods, When it lived, how tall it was, how long it was, and what made it unique among dinosaurs. Could you possibly show a picture of a stegosaur skeleton? I am having trouble finding facts about a stegosaurus.could you plese help me.
from D.R.H., Las Cruces, NM, USA; February 9, 2000

A: For information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: why was the discovery of Lystrosaurus in Antarctica so important?
from shayla, new york, new york, USA; February 9, 2000

A: Since fossils of Lystrosaurus had been found in South Africa, India, Europe, and Asia, finding Lystrosaurus in Antarctica was further evidence that during the late Permian period and Triassic period, the continents were connected into one large continent (called Gondwananland). For more information on Lystrosaurus, click here.



Q: What is the history of the Archaeothyris?????
from ami, parsippany, nj, USA; February 9, 2000

A: For information on Archaeothyris, click here.



Q: Which dinosaur did scientist once believe had two brains?
from Kayla, cooksforest, PA, USA; February 9, 2000

A: Stegosaurus was once believed to have two brains.



Q: what is the scientific name of the dinosaur name triceratops?? (comment: could you make a list of all the scientific names of the dinosaurs, please?) THANK YOU
from cynthia m., Chicago, IL, USA; February 8, 2000

A: Unlike most other animals, dinosaurs are known by their scientific name (their genus). For example, the genus of Triceratops is Triceratops. There is some disagreement about how many species of Triceratops have been found. Some paleontologists (notably Ostrom and Welnhoffer, 1990) believe there is one species, Triceratops horridus. Others believe that there are two (C. Forster, 1996) or more species, including: Triceratops horridus, Triceratops prorsus, Triceratops albertensis, Triceratops ingens, Triceratops alticornis, and perhaps others.

For a list of all known dinosaur genera, click here.



Q: Is a Tyrannosaurus Rex warm or cold blooded? Where can i find environment information on dinosaurs?
from Alison M., kingwood, tx, USA; February 7, 2000

A: No one knows if the dinosaurs were cold-blooded, warm-blooded, or if some were cold-blooded and others were warm-blooded. For more information on this topic, click here. There is very little information on the many different environments that existed during the Mesozoic. For some information, click here.



Q: how much did the ankylosaurs weigh?
from NAME, CITYSTATE, USA; February 7, 2000

A: Ankylosaurus weighed about roughly 5 tons (5400 kg). For more information on Ankylosaurus, click here.



Q: Who invented the term dinosaur?
from Alex F., cincinnati, Ohio, USA; February 7, 2000

A: Richard Owen coined the word dinosaur, meaning "fearfully great lizard," in 1842. In Greek, deinos means "fearfully great" and sauros means "lizard." . For more information on naming dinosaurs, click here.



Q: How do you know what they ate
from ?, USA; February 7, 2000

A: For some dinosaurs, fossilized stomach contents have been found (for example, Baryonyx was found with fossilized fish scales and bones in its stomach). For others, fossilized dung has been found (for example, T. rex dung was found containing fossilized Triceratops bones). For more information on dinosaur diets, click here.



Q: How do you know when it is a fossil?
from Becca B., Lombard, Illinois, USA; February 7, 2000

A: The fossil of an item has the same shape as the original item, but is much denser (because a fossils is made out of rocks and minerals). The color of a fossil also varies widely, depending on the type of minerals that replaces the original molecules.



Q: Do you have any information on a extinct bird by the name of Cariama.
from Ethan P., Helper, Utah, USA; February 7, 2000

A: The Cariama (also known as the Seriema), is a modern-day bird; it is not extinct. In his TV series, David Attenborough used the Red-legged Seriema to show how the 150 million-year-old Archaeopteryx might have evolved the ability to fly. The Seriema is a long-legged bird from South America.



Q: Whats the Brachiosaurus life span?
from Kelly R., langeloth, PA, USA; February 7, 2000

A: It may have lived about 100 years. For more information on Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: I'm doing a report on dinosaurs and I have to build a time machine and go back to the Mesozoic Era I need an exact date to put in my time machine. Can you help me?
from Kyle K, Tuckerton, NJ, USA; February 7, 2000

A: Click here for Mesozoic Era dates.



Q: How long would it take for an oviraptor egg to hatch after being laid?
from David S., Alsip, IL, USA; February 7, 2000

A: No oe knows. For information on Oviraptor, click here.



Q: what is a feathered dinosaur
from ?; February 7, 2000

A: A dinosaur with feathers (like Caudipteryx or Sinosauropteryx).



Q: Does Quebec City have a natural history museum? I am going there later this year, and I would like to know if I will be able to see some dinosaurs on my trip.
from Brad M., Woodville, Ontario, Canada; February 7, 2000

A: I don't think so (but I live thousands of miles away and haven't been to Quebec in over 20 years). According to "The Dinosaur Data Book" (1990, Avon Books) the Redpath Museum in Quebec has a few dinosaur fossil fragments, but they aren't on display (or at least they weren't when that book was written). Here's a site on Canadian museums; they might have the information you need.



Q: How did Mamoths get extinct?
from Andrew M., Stourbridge, West Midlands, England; February 7, 2000

A: They went extinct when the last Ige Age ended, about 10,000 years ago. For more information on mammoths, click here.



Q: Is there information about prehistoric mammals on this web-site?
from Anika N, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; February 7, 2000

A: Yes, click here.



Q: did dinosaurs poop?
from Jenna f, River Falls, WI, USA; February 6, 2000

A: Yes. For information on fossilized T. rex poop, click here and scroll down to the section on dung.



Q: Can you give me information about ankylosaurus?
from Joe A., Los Angeles, CA, USA; February 6, 2000

A: Click here for information on Ankylosaurus.



Q: what was the two first dinosaurs discovered?
from Jamey F., river dolls, WI, USA; February 5, 2000

A: Megalosaurus and Iguanodon. For more information on these early dinosaur discoveries, click here



Q: what year was the iguanodon discovered (its bones)? what are the relatives of iguanodon?? what were iguanodon's mating habits? PLEASE!!!!!!!HELP ME I'VE LOOKED EVERY WERE,BUT CANT FIND THIS INFO ABOUT THE IGUANODON:ITS LIFE SPAN,MATING HABITS,ENEMIES,AND HOW LONG THEY LIVED SOMEONE PPPPPPLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAASSSSSSSEEEEEEE HELP!!!!
from nicole f., tampa, fl, USA; February 5, 2000

A: Iguanodon was named by Gideon A. Mantell in 1825. For more information on Iguanodon, click here. Other iguanodontids (relatives of Iguanodon) included Ouranosaurus, Probactrosaurus, Tenontosaurus, Rhabdodon, etc. No one knows about its mating habits or life span.

No one knows exactly which dinosaurs preyed upon Iguanodon, but you can guess, by looking up which meat-eating dinosaurs lived during the same time (the early Cretaceous period) and in the same area (North America and Western Europe). For its contemporaries, click here and scroll down to the sections on North America and Europe and find meat-eaters (listed in red) that were big enough to attack a 30-foot-long dinosaur (like Altispinax). Smaller meat-eaters might have hunted in packs, so some of the smaller ones may have preyed upon Iguanodon.



Q: Look at a question asked on February 3. It said that Stegosaurus lived in the late Jurassic period, 156-140 million years ago. However, the Jurassic was 206 to 144 and the period from 156 to 140 DOES contain 4 million years outside the Jurassic.
from Jimmy L., Georgia, USA; February 3, 2000

A: Stegosaurus probably went extinct at the end-Jurassic exitnction. Although the dates of the geologic periods are generally given as absolutes, they aren't (also, the dates for the beginning and end of the various periods vary from source to source - I use the figures from UCMP) and these figures change over time as more fossil information is interpreted. Pinpointing the end of a geologic time era is impossible; when does an ice age officially begin, or an extinction end? When a comet hits the Earth, is that moment the end of one age and the beginning of another, or do you wait until some extinctions occur (and if so, how many? There is a long fuzzy period between the various geologic time periods. The margin of error between ages is in the range of plus or minus 1 to 5 million years (which represents 2 standard deviations around the calculated mean - it may be bigger). Some sources, like the American Museum of Natural History put the end of Stegsaurus at 140 mya, other just say late in the Jurassic.



Q: What can you tell us about the extinction theory on mammals eating dinosuars eggs?
from shaina s., narragansett, rhode island, USA; February 3, 2000

A: For information on this extinction theory and others, click here.



Q: Do you know when the Chirostenotes became extinct? Also do know who its main predators? What about how it adapted to its environment? I hope you know. Thanks!
from Leah G., Teaneck, NJ, USA; February 3, 2000

A: Chirostenotes lived during the late Cretaceous period; it went extinct about 71 million years ago. To find possible predators (no one knows which animals preyed upon it, but you can guess, knowing its size, when and where it lived). Go to the page on fossils from the late Cretaceous, and scroll down to the yellow section on North American fossils (since Chirostenotes was found in Canada). The fossils in red were meat-eaters - you can decide which ones were likely predators of Chirostenotes (which was about 2 m long). Almost everything about an organism reflects an adaptation to its environment. For more information on Chirostenotes, click here.



Q: The stegasarous lived in wich years in the mezazoic era? How much did the stegasarous weigh?
from Jason L., Beavercreek, Ohio, USA; February 3, 2000

A: Stegosaurus lived about 156-140 million years ago during the late Jurassic period. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: What is the latest dinosaur findings? Where was it found and how big was it?
from Katy F., Azle, TX, USA; February 3, 2000

A: Click here for dino news.



Q: What does the word reptille mean
from ?; February 3, 2000

A: Reptile means "to creep." For more information on reptiles, click here.



Q: where were the dinosaurs found?
from k , Pleasant, texas, USA; February 2, 2000

A: For a list of where the dinosaurs were found, continent by continent, click here.



Q: do you have any information or any pictures on the woolly mammoth being intact frozen with the tissue still on the mammal. P.S. could you please give me the answer a.s.a.p. Thank you Sincerely, Nicole
from Nicole W., indianapolis, indiana, USA; February 2, 2000

A: For information on the woolly mammoth, click here.



Q: Last week I was looking up information for my 5-year-old, and I read a short article entitled something like "Why is there no brontosaurus?", and I'm pretty sure I read it here (Zoom Dinosaurs). It went into detail of how the paleontologist put the wrong head on an Apatasaurus and called it "brontosaurus". However, now I can't find it anywhere! Where did it go? I need it to prove a point to a teacher. Thanks in advance!
from Amy A-P, Mamaroneck, New York, USA; February 2, 2000

A: The original Brontosaurus fossil, found in 1879, lacked a skull (as many fossils do). Othniel Marsh added a skull found miles away (this skull did not belong to the Brontosaurus, but to a Camarasaurus). In 1900, Henry Osborn assembled another skull-less Brontosaurus at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, adding a cast of Marsh's skull. In 1915, Earl Douglass of the Carnegie Museum found a Brontosaurus fossil that included a skull, but because of Osborn's influence, the Carnegie displayed the fossil skull-less. When Douglas died in 1932, the incorrect skull was put on display! It wasn't until 1975 that the proper skull was mounted on Brontosaurus/Apatosaurus fossils in museums. The American Museum of Natural History in New York City still doesn't show an Apatosaurus fossil on their website.

The naming problem is another story. The American paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh described and named Apatosaurus in 1877. A few years later, in 1879, he described and named another fossil, Brontosaurus. It turned out that the two dinosaurs were actually two species of the same genus. The earlier scientific name, Apatosaurus, was adopted.



Q: Hello, I am in the Second Grade and I have a Project on Dinosaurs here are some of the questions Why aren't there any around today? How could they come back? and Are there creatures similar to them today? Thank you,
from Tre' C., Baton Rouge, LA, USA; February 2, 2000

A: The dinosaurs aren't here today because they went extinct 65 million years ago. They could theoretically be resurrected if intact DNA (genetic material) was found (as in the movie Jurassic Park). The birds are the animals closest to the Mesozoic dinosaurs.



Q: Could you tell me how to get info. about the period called Permian?
from Sarah M., Stephens city, Virginia, USA; February 2, 2000

A: Click here.



Q: During what period did the Allosaurus live?
from ?; February 2, 2000

A: Allosaurus lived during the late Jurassic period, about 154 million to 144 million years ago. For more information on Allosaurus, click here.



Q: what are some plants that lived in the jurassic period
from ?; February 1, 2000

A: For a page on Jurassic period plants, click here.



Q: What was dinosuar skin like?
from ?; February 1, 2000

A: For information on dinosaur skin, click here.



Q: Where did the supersuarus live?
from Regina P., piscataway, NJ, USA; February 1, 2000

A: Supersaurus fossils have been found in the western USA. For more information on Supersaurus, click here.



Q: how long is a stegosaurous
from leanne p, wolverhampton, USA; February 1, 2000

A: Stegosaurus was about 26-30 feet (8-9 m) long. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: I am in second grade and need to study Amphicoelias. I need to know whether or not it has teeth, the way it protected itself or attacked and some interesting facts. I am having a really hard time finding any information about it. Thanks.
from Elise E., Brecksville, Ohio, USA; February 1, 2000

A: Only a single vertebrae (backbone) of this huge dinosaur was ever found, and it has since disappeared. Very little is known is about this dinosaur. It was a sauropod, a plant-eater that probably had teeth (since other sauropods did). It best protection was its large size. For more information on Amphicoelias, click here.




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