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Dinosaur and Paleontology Dictionary
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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K



KAGASAURUS

(pronounced KAH-guh-SAWR-us) Kagasaurus was a large, meat-eating, biped, a dinosaur from the early Cretaceous period, about 135-100 million years ago. This theropod is only known from a large, sharp, fossilized tooth found in Japan. Kagasaurus is a doubtful genus since only a tooth has been found.


KAIJIANGOSAURUS

(pronounced kie-JANG-oh-SAWR-us) Kaijiangosaurus (meaning "Kai River lizard") was a meat-eating, biped, a theropod dinosaur from the mid Jurassic period about 175-163 million years ago. This Tetanuran is only known from fossil vertebrae found in China. Kaijiangosaurus was named by paleontologist He in 1984. The type species is K. lini.


KAKURU

(pronounced ka-KOO-roo or KA-koo-roo) Kakuru (meaning "rainbow serpent," because it is known from an opal tibia) was a dinosaur from the early Cretaceous period, about 119-113 million years ago. It is known from a tibia, a leg bone which was fossilized as an opal (and the only dinosaur fossil preserved this way). Kakuru was a small, bird-like theropod, a meat-eater perhaps related to Avimimus. It was found in Australia. It was named by Molnar & Pledge in 1980.


KANGNASAURUS

(pronounced KANG-na-SAWR-us) Kangnasaurus (meaning "Kangna (a farm in South Africa) lizard") was a small, plant-eating dinosaur, an iguanodontid ornithopod from the early Cretaceous period, about 145-97.5 million years ago. This dinosaur is only known from a very incomplete fossil found in Little Namaqualand, South Africa. Kangnasaurus was named by paleontologist Haughton in 1915. The type species is K. coetzeei. This is a doubtful genus.


KANNEMEYERIA

Kannemeyeria was a small dicynodont (a mammal-like reptile, not a dinosaur) from the early Triassic period. This early therapsid was an herbivore (a plant-eater) with sprawling legs that lived on open plains. It was hunted by predators like Cynognathus (another early therapsid). Fossils have been found in Africa.


KATSUYAMASAURUS

(pronounced cat-SOO-yah-muh-SAWR-us) Katsuyamasaurus was a large, meat-eating dinosaur from the early Cretaceous period, about 145-97.5 million years ago. This theropod is only known from a lower arm bone found in Japan. This is a doubtful genus.


KEICHOUSAURUS

(pronounced KEE-chi-oh-SAUR-us) Keichousaurus hui was an early reptile (not a dinosaur) that lived during the Triassic period, roughly 210 million years ago. Keishousaurus was about 6-11 inches (15-29 cm) long and had a long neck, a long tail, five-toed feet with long digits, and a pointed head with sharp teeth. It may have lived in the water. This quadruped had sturdy legs. Fossils have been found in Guanglin, Guizhou Province, China.


KELMAYISAURUS

Kelmayisaurus (meaning "Kelmayi [a city in China] lizard") was a large, bipedal, meat-eating dinosaur, a theropod, from the early Cretaceous period, about 119 to 97.5 million years ago. Fossils have been found in China. The type species is K. petrolicus. Kelmayisaurus was named by Dong in 1973. This poorly-known dinosaur is a doubtful genus.

KENTROSAURUS

(pronounced KEN-troh-SAWR-us) Kentrosaurus was a late-Jurassic stegosaur with both spikes and plates. It was about 17 feet (5 m) long and lived during the late Jurassic period, roughly 156-150 million years ago.


KHAAN

(pronounced KAAN) Khaan (meaning "lord" in Mongolian) was an oviraptorid dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. This theropod is known from an almost complete fossil found in the Djadokhta Formation, Ukhaa Tolgod, Mongolia. Khaan was named by Clark, James M., Norell, Mark A. and Barsbold, Rinchen in 2001; the type species is K. mckennai.

KINGDOM

In classification, a kingdom is the highest grouping of similar organisms. A kingdom contains one or more phyla (plural of phylum). Life on Earth is divided into five kingdoms: Animalia (animals), Plantae (plants), Fungi, Protista (protozoans and eucaryotic algae), and Monera (prokaryotes: blue-green algae and bacteria).


KITADANISAURUS

(pronounced KAH-guh-SAWR-us) Kitadanisaurus was a small, meat-eating, biped, a dinosaur from the early Cretaceous period, about 144-97.5 million years ago. This theropod is only known from a sharp, fossilized tooth found in Japan. Kitadanisaurus is a doubtful genus since only this tooth has been found.
KIRKLAND, JAMES I.
James Ian Kirkland (1954- ) is an American geologist and paleontologist who has studied dinosaurs from the soutwestern USA for over 20 years, discovering many new and important genera. Kirkland named (or co-named) the dinosaurs: Animantarx (Carpenter, Kirkland, Burge, and Bird, 1999), "Eohadrosaurus" (Kirkland, 1997 [nomen nudum]), Eolambia (Kirkland, 1998), Gastonia (Kirkland, 1998), Mymoorapelta (Kirkland and Carpenter, 1994), Nedcolbertia (Kirkland, Britt, Whittle, S. K. Madsen, and Burge, 1998), Utahraptor (Kirkland, Burge, and Gaston, 1993), and Zuniceratops (Wolfe and Kirkland, 1998). Kirkland is an adjunct Professor of Geology at Mesa State College, Grand Junction, Colorado, a research Associate of the Denver Museum of Natural History, and a Utah State Paleontologist with the Utah Geologic Survey.


KLAMELISAURUS

(pronounced klah-MEH-lee-SAWR-us ) Klamelisaurus (meaning "Klameli {China} lizard") was a sauropod dinosaur from the middle Jurassic period. This long-necked, long-tailed, quadrupedal plant-eater is known from fossils found in the Jiangjun Desert region of China. It was named by Zhao in 1993.


KOOLASUCHUS

(pronounced KOOL-uh-SOOK-us) Koolasuchus (meaning "Kool's crocodile," for Lesley Kool) was a labyrinthodont (an amphibian and not a dinosaur) from the Jurassic period to the early Cretaceous, roughly 120 million years ago. It was found in Victoria, Australia by Mike Cleeland in 1989. Two 31 inch (80 cm) long jaws were found. Lesley Kool later fully excavated the jaws. Koolasuchus was a long-tailed quadruped that was about 16 ft (5 m) long. It had wide, powerful jaws and teeth with maze-like infoldings. This carnivore's diet probably included lungfish and turtles. The type species is Koolasuchus cleelandi.


KOPARION

(pronounced co-PARR-ee-on) Koparion (meaning "scalpel tooth") was a meat-eating, bipedal theropod dinosaur, a Coelurosaur from the late Jurassic period. This Tetanuran is only known from an upper tooth found in Utah, USA. It may have been about 1.5 ft (0.5 m) long. It was named by Chure in 1994. The type species is K. douglassi.

KOTASAURUS

(pronounced KOHT-ah-SAWR-us) Kotasaurus (meaning "Kota [Formation] lizard") was a largesauropod dinosaur from the early Jurassic period, about 208 million to 188 million years ago. It is the most primitive known sauropod, and is similar to prosauropods in some ways (the hip bones). This quadrupedal plant-eater was about 30 ft (9 m) long. It had a bulky body, a long tail and a long neck. It is known from a partial skeleton found in India (with no skull). It was named by Yadagiri in 1988. The type species is K. yamanpalliensis.

KRITOSAURUS
(pronounced KRIT-oh-SAWR-us) Kritosaurus (meaning "Noble lizard") is a doubtful genus; this fossils may actually be Gryposaurus, but may be a separate genus. It was a duck-billed dinosaur from the late Cretaceous period, about 76 to 65 million years ago. This hadrosaurid was a plant-eater that was about 30 feet (9 m) long. It had a flat head and a big bump on its snout. It is known from a fragmentary skull found in the San Juan basin of New Mexico, USA. Kritosaurus was named by fossil hunter Barnum Brown in 1910. The type species is K. navajovius (known from a poorly-preserved skull).

KRONOSAURUS

(pronounced KRONE-oh-SAWR-us) Kronosaurus was a plesiosaur 30 feet (9 m) long with a short neck and huge head and jaws. The head was up to 9 feet (2.7 m) long, about 1/4 of the entire length of the body. It had rounded teeth at the back of the jaws to crush shells and cephalopods. It lived in the seas that covered parts of Australia during the early Cretaceous period. Fossils have been found in Australia. It was discovered in Queensland, Australia in 1889 by A Crombie; it was named and described by Longman in 1924. It was not a dinosaur, but a plesiosaur, another type of extinct reptile. Classification: Order Plesiosauria, Superfamily Pliosauroidea, Family Dolichorhynchopidae.


K-T BOUNDARY

The K-T Boundary was the boundary between the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods, occurring 65 million years ago. This was a time of the huge K-T mass extinction.


K-T EXTINCTION

The K-T extinction was the mass extinction that occurred 65 million years ago, at the boundary of the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods.

KUEHNEOSAURUS

(pronounced CUNE-ee-oh-SAWR-us) Kuehneosaurus (meaning "Kuehne's lizard") was a very early lizard (not a dinosaur) with wing-like membranes between the front and rear legs. It could glide through the air using these triangular flaps. The membranes were over 12 inches (30 cm) when spread out. Kuehneosaurus itself was 26 inches (65 cm) long. This meat-eater had powerful jaws, four long, thin limbs (the rear legs were longer than the front legs), and a very long, thin tail. It dates from the late Triassic period (over 200 million years ago) in England.


KULCERATOPS

(pronounced kool-SER-ah-tops) Kulceratops (meaning "lake-horned face") was an early ceratopsian dinosaur (a frilled, horned plant-eater) from the early Cretaceous period. Only a jaw bone was found (in Uzbekistan); this is a dubious genus. It was named by Nessov in 1995.


KUNMINGOSAURUS

(pronounced KUNE-MING-oh-SAWR-us) Kunmingosaurus (meaning "Kunming lizard") was a primitive sauropod dinosaur (a frilled, horned plant-eater) from the early Jurassic period. Fossils of this quadrupedal plant-eater were found in Yunnan Province, China. It was named by Chao in 1985.

ZoomDinosaurs.com
Dinosaur and Paleontology Dictionary
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Click on an underlined word for more information on that subject.
If the dinosaur or paleontology term you are looking for is not in the dictionary, please e-mail us.

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