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Zoom Dinosaurs
DINOSAUR QUESTIONS
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Questions from October 1998




Q: Who is the one who named Anklyosaurs, and who discoverd the first one?
from Ryan T., Sandwich, Illinois, USA; October 31, 1998

A: Barnum Brown named the family Ankylosauria. Gideon Mantell discovered the first ankylosaur, Hylaeosaurus in 1833. For more information on Brown and Mantell, see the page on fossil hunters.



Q: What does the word sauros mean?
from han han jo, ?, USA; October 30, 1998

A: Sauros in Greek means lizard.



Q: What does denios mean?
from Carrie J, Arlington, VA, USA; October 30, 1998

A: Deinos in Greek roughly means terrifying.



Q: what is galapasaurus?
from storm, monroe, maine, USA; October 29, 1998

A: I've never heard of it.



Q: how much does a pterodactyl weigh?
from brandy m, va, USA; October 29, 1998

A: The Pterodactyls were a group of many flying reptiles that included tiny fliers like Pterodactylus (with a 20 inch wingspan) up to giant gliders like Quetzalcoatlus (with a 40 foot wingspan). For more information on Pterodactyls, click here.



Q: What does the name Ornithomimimus mean?
from Michael T., Fremont, CA, USA; October 29, 1998

A: Bird mimic. For more info on Ornithomimus, click here.



Q: how did the dinosuars die?
from Michael M., ?; October 29, 1998

A: They died in the K-T mass extinction - click here for more info.



Q: How can you tell how old dinosaurs were?
from Octavia W., Astabula, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: See this page on dinosaur life spans.



Q: What was the tallest dinosaur? How tall was it?
from Kim W., Astabula, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: The tallest dinosaurs were brachiosaurids, like Ultrasauros and Brachiosaurus. For more details, see the section on extreme dinosaur.



Q: How many teeth did a T Rex have?
from Sherry L., Astabula, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: About 60. For more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: What was the average live span of a dinosaur?
from Pat G., Astabula, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: This must have varied widely among the dinosaur. For more information see this page on dinosaur life spans.



Q: How much did a long neck weigh?
from Dawn P., Astabula, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: The largest of the sauropods (long-necks) may have weighed up to 100 tons (a ton is 2,000 pounds).



Q: Was Pachycephalosaurus friendly or vicious and how many were there or how many have been found.
from Marvin S., Concord, Ohio, USA; October 29, 1998

A: Pachycephalosaurus was a plant eater and probably not vicious. Pachycephalosaurus is known from many skull fragments found in Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming, USA. For more information on Pachycephalosaurus, click here.



Q: What was the K-T mass extinction? How much did the Quetzalcoalus weigh? What kind of fish did they eat? How did they catch them?Do you know of any other web-sites that would be helpful to find more information on the Quetzalcoatlus? Why is it not comsidered a real dinosaur? Why was the Quetzalcoatlus named after the God Quetzalcoatl?
from Moesha, Groton-Dunstable, Massachusetts, USA; October 29, 1998

A: For information on the K-T mass extinction, click here.

As to why Pterosaurs (like Quetzalcoatlus) are not considered dinosaurs: By definition, all dinosaurs were diapsid reptiles with an upright stance. Pterosaurs probably had a semi-upright stance. There is a small minority of paleontologists who think that the pterosaurs' stance could have been upright and that pterosaurs should therefore be included in the clade of dinosaurs (being derived theropods). Either way, dinosaurs and pterosaurs are certainly closely related.

Quetzalcoatlus was a huge, flying reptile found in Texas. It was named after Quetzalcoatl, an Aztec feathered god, presumably because Quetzalcoatlus was an impressive animal that flew (although it didn't have feathers). For more information on Quetzalcoatlus, click here.



Q: I am doing a report about Great WHite Sharks and need to include the scientific classification from kingdom to species, but I can't find it ANYWHERE! We do not have very many books in our library becuz we live on a remote island. can you help me?
from Zane Z., Unalaska, Alaska, USA; October 28, 1998

A: There's an information sheet on the Great White Shark in Zoom Sharks with this information, located here.



Q: I have a school project. I want to ask, if Pachycephalosaurus cares for its young..
from Marvin S,, Concord, Ohio, USA; October 28, 1998

A: This isn't known. Pachycephalosaurus was probably a herding animal, but I've never seen any references to fossils of Pachycephalosaurus found together with nests or hatchlings. For a page on Pachycephalosaurus, click here.



Q: We would like to know where and when the first dinosaur bones were found.
from Chestnut School Third Grade, Ashtabula, Ohio, USA; October 28, 1998

A: For a page on this the first dinosaurs fossils found, click here.



Q: When did the dinosaurs become extinct?
from Jayme M., Hutchinson, MI, USA; October 28, 1998

A: 65 million years ago.



Q: I am looking for information about the diplocaulus, I have to do a report for school. Thanks.
from Johnita L., San Diego, CA, USA; October 27, 1998

A: For information on Diplocaulus (not a dinosaur, but an ancient amphibian), look under "D" in the Dinosaur Dictionary.



Q: How long is the incubation period of a dinosaur egg?
from Renata, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; October 27, 1998

A: No one knows.



Q: What are some names of dinosaurs?
from Monique G., Sydney, NSW, Australia, USA; October 27, 1998

A: For a list of some dinosaur names, click here.



Q: Were Dinosaurs warm blooded or cold blooded ? What was the biggest Dinosaur?
from Amanda W., Sydney, Australia; October 27, 1998

A: No one knows whether the dinosaurs were cold-blooded, warm-blooded, or if some were cold-blooded and some were warm-blooded. For more details on this topic, click here.

For a list of some of the largest dinosaurs, click here.



Q: I am doing a report on T-Rex and need to know about its family life. Can you help me? Thank you...oh yeah, I only have 36 hours before my report is due....help!
from Derrick B., Caro, MI, USA; October 27, 1998

A: T. rex probably didn't have much of a family life - or a social life for that matter.

There's no fossil evidence that any theropods (meat-eaters like T. rex) took care of their young, but they may have taken care of the hatchlings for a short time in that vulnerable time right after hatching, like most birds do. T. rex was probably a solitary hunter, since most reptiles and birds are and there is no fossil evidence to support packs of T. rex.

For more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: what is sauros defined as?
from Taran C., and Seth S., Ashville, Ohio and Zack, Corcollville, Ohio, USA; October 27, 1998

A: Sauros means lizard in Greek.



Q: WHAT DID PTERANODONS EAT?
from J.C.; October 27, 1998

A: Although they had no teeth, Pteranodons were carnivores. They ate fish (which they caught at the surface of the oceans), mollusks, crabs, insects, and scavenged dead animals on land. They may have hunted like modern-day pelicans, scooping fish out of the water and swallowing them whole. For more information on Pteranodon, click here.



Q: When was the jurassic period?
from Ben B., Perth, Western Australia, Australia; October 27, 1998

A: The Jurassic period lasted from 208 to 146 million years ago. For more information about the Jurassic period, click here.



Q: What does the Carcharodontasaurus look like? Does it look exactly like a T-rex only bigger? Please send me a pic.
from ???; October 26, 1998

A: No, it didn't. They were very different dinosaurs. They had a different number of fingers, had different builds, different type of teeth, brain size, etc. For details, compare the information sheet on each: T. rex and Carcharodontosaurus.



Q: what,s the biggest fossil found?
from anthony w, kyabram, victoria, Australia; October 26, 1998

A: The largest fossil bones found are from sauropods and include the 8 feet (2.45 m) long shoulder blade of the Ultrasauros, Brachiosaurus thigh bones over 6 feet (1.8 m) long, and neck vertebrae of Seismosaurus that are over 6 feet (1.8 m) long.



Q: WHat does the saurolophus eat? what are some unique facts about it? and how big is it? Where did it live?
from Gina L., Hershey, PA, USA; October 26, 1998

A: For an information sheet on Saurolophus, click here.



Q: I'm doing a project on this statement: Dinosaurs that were predators of other dinosaurs were bipeds and all dinosaurs that were predators of mammals were quadrupeds? Help Me.
from Jeff Q., Guelph, Ontario, Canada; October 25, 1998

A: The predatory (meat-eating) dinosaurs were the theropods which were all bipeds. Only a few of the very early prosauropods were omnivores, and their diet may have included small dinosaurs, insects, and mammals. These saurischian dinosaurs were semi-quadrupedal, able to walk on two or four legs.



Q: What is the scientific names for T-rex, Brachiosaurus, Stegosaurus, Triceratops
from Tibor U., Brisbane, Qld., Australia; October 25, 1998

A: The dinosaurs are the only animals that are commonly known by their scientific name. Tyrannosaurus is the scientific genus name, rex is the species name. Brachiosaurus, Stegosaurus and Triceratops are also the scientific genus names for these dinosaurs.



Q: My brother is doing a project for school on Ornithosuchus and Teratosaurus.Can you please tell me when they lived, their eating habits,herding habits and type of habitat they needed. Also when either one became extinct and their weight, height, speed and anything else PLEASE!!! we need this info A.S.A.P. thanks alot.
from Meghan W., Sault Ste. Marie, Canada; October 25, 1998

A: Look in the Dinosaur Dictionary under "O" and "T."



Q: How many periods were there in each of the five eras
from Allan J., Brisbane, Qld., Australia; October 23, 1998

A: It differed. The Cenozoic Era is divided into 2, so far, the Mesozoic Era into 3, the Paleozoic Era into 6. For more details, see the geologic time chart, short or long version.



Q: What was the largest meat eater ever found besides the T-rex and the one they found that was a little bit lager than that? They found 2 different types of species (Meat Eating) that were lager than theT-rex and I want to know both. Thank You.
from Anthony L., Sunrise, FL, USA; October 23, 1998

A: Giganotosaurus, found in South America, and Carcharodontosaurus, found in Africa.



Q: what did triceratops eat?
from mike D., Elk Grove, IL, USA; October 22, 1998

A: Triceratops was an herbivore, a plant eater. It probably ate cycads, palms, and other prehistoric plants with its tough, toothed beak.



Q: What did an Ichthyosaurs eat?
from James Mc C, Phil., PA, USA; October 22, 1998

A: Ichthyosaurs were carnivores; they ate fish, octopus, and other swimming animals. For an information sheet on Ichthyosaurs, click here.



Q: In what period did Diplodocus and Spinosaurus live in?
from David H, Timaru, New Zealand, USA; October 21, 1998

A: Diplodocus lived in the late Jurassic Period, from 155-145 million years ago. Spinosaurus lived during the late Cretaceous period, about 98 to 95 million years ago.



Q: Did baby Stegasaurs's have plates?
from James Mc C, Phil., PA, USA; October 21, 1998

A: Yes.



Q: Were dinos smart?? how big were they??
from Korey W., Chico, CA, USA; October 21, 1998

A: For a page on dinosaur intelligence, click here. For a page on dinosaur sizes, click here.



Q: are cretaceous dinosaurs warm or cold blooded, where do they live at ,what they eat, how did they become extinct
from Sabrina T., Roachdale, Indiana, USA; October 21, 1998

A: Click here for information on the dinosaurs that lived during the Cretaceous period. Click here for a discussion on whether dinosaurs were hot- or cold- blooded.



Q: How did Dimetrodon defend itself aginst its predators?
from Kurt M., Eustache, Qc, Canada; October 20, 1998

A: With its many sharp teeth, powerful jaws and speed (it had a speed advantage over most of its cold-blooded contemporaries because its sail let it warm up faster in the morning, and be active earlier).



Q: What color where the dinosaurs
from rob, Brisbane, qld, Australia; October 20, 1998

A: No one knows.



Q: What are the periods that the Stegosaurus, Plesiosaur, Triceratops and Megalasaurus lived?
from Andrea, Troy, Michigan, USA; October 20, 1998

A: Stegosaurus lived during the late Jurassic period. Megalasaurus lived during the mid-Jurassic. Triceratops lived during the late Cretaceous period. Various Plesiosaurs lived from the early Jurassic to the end of the Cretaceous.For more exact dates, click on the name of the animal to go to an information sheet about it.



Q: How did the Brachiosaurus defend itself?
from Jen D., NJ, USA; October 19, 1998

A: The large sauropods' (like Apatosaurus and Brachiosaurus) best defense was size. In addition, their tails could whip away some attackers. Also, they had leathery skin, although this wasn't much of a defense against sharp theropod teeth. They also had clawed feet that were more pronounced in the young. For more information on Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: How many dinosaur types were there?
from Morgan.M, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; October 19, 1998

A: There are about 330 described dinosaur genera. There are varying estimates of how many dinosaur genera there were; estimates range from about 1,000 to over 10,000.



Q: How big was a Diplodocus?
from Michelle, Toronto, Ontario; October 19, 1998

A: Diplodocus was about 90 feet (27 m) long. For more information on Diplodocus, click here.



Q: What is the scientific name of the Compsognathus?
from Lauren K, Toledo, Ohio, USA; October 19, 1998

A: Compsognathus is the scientific name of that genus. The dinosaurs are the only animals that are commonly known by their scientific names.



Q: how did the dinosaurs drink if thay were so tall?
from Jesse H., Stockbridge, GA, USA; October 19, 1998

A: The tall dinosaurs probably drank water like giraffes do.



Q: Could you please tell me which dinosaur had two brains (if any)?
from David H., Timaru, New Zealand; October 18, 1998

A: It used to be thought that some sauropods and Stegosaurids had a second brain at the base of the tail. Paleontologists now think that what they thought was a second brain was an enlargement in the spinal cord in the hip area, containing nerves and fatty tissue. This spinal enlargement was larger than the animal's tiny brain and may have controlled the animal's hind legs and tail.



Q: How do YOU think dinosaurs became extinct?
from Blake H., Carthage, MO, USA; October 18, 1998

A: The Alvarez Asteroid Theory.



Q: What is the first known discovery of Brachiosaurus fossil remains (where, when, by whom)?
from Kim, Kutztown, PA, USA; October 18, 1998

A: Brachiosaurus was first found in the Grand River Valley, in western Colorado, USA, in 1900. This incomplete skeleton was described by paleontologist Elmer S. Riggs, who named Brachiosaurus in 1903. For more information on Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: My question is about the ankylosaur.Where are it's fossils been found, and who discovered the ankylosaur?
from Michelle P., Ohio, USA; October 18, 1998

A: I don't know if you're referring to the first Ankylosaur discovered, which is Hylaeosaurus (fossils have been found in southeast England; it was named in 1833 by the British paleontologist Gideon A. Mantell) or Ankylosaurus (found in Montana, USA, and Alberta, Canada; it was first found by Barnum Brown in 1908). For more information on Ankylosaurus, click here; for more information on Hylaeosaurus, click here.



Q: To help a class of third graders, please tell me the real name of The Long Neck and tell us if it had two brains. Some of the students seem to think so. I told them I needed proof. Some of the students seem to think there was one in the head and one in the tail. Thank you for your help.
from Lynn M., Pierpoint, Ohio, USA; October 17, 1998

A: Apatosaurus is a popular long-necked dinosaur. It belongs to the group of plant-eating dinosaurs called sauropods. They had a long, whip-like tail, a small head, blunt teeth, short legs, and a big body.

It used to be thought that the sauropods (like Apatosaurus) had a second brain at the base of the tail. Paleontologists now realize that what they thought was a second brain was an enlargement in the spinal cord in the hip area, containing nerves and fatty tissue. This enlargement was larger than the animal's tiny brain and may have controlled the animal's hind legs and tail and. For more information on Apatosaurus, click here.



Q: How much did Triceratops weigh?
from Mike D., Elkgrove, IL, USA; October 16, 1998

A: About 6-12 tons. For more information on Triceratops, click here.



Q: How long is the T-REX'S TEETH?
from Jonathan, Duluth, GA, USA; October 16, 1998

A: T. rex's teeth were up to 9 inches (23 cm) long. For more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: What was the length of Spinosaurus and what country was it from? What dinosaurs might it have eaten?
from Spiny, Marshall VA, USA; October 15, 1998

A: For an information sheet on Spinosaurus, click here.



Q: Why was dinosaurs extinct. thank you for ansering my question.
from Anthony, Deton, ?; October 15, 1998

A: See the question 5 below this one.



Q: What information can you tell me about Lystrosaurus?
from Ashley, National Park, NJ, USA; October 15, 1998

A: Lystrosaurus was a heavily-built, quadrupedal, early Triassic period reptile (but not a dinosaur) with a short, stubby tail. Instead of teeth it had two tusk-like fangs made of horn. It was a plant-eater about 3 feet (1 m) long that lived in herds near lakes and swamps. For a little more information see the Dinosaur Dictionary under "L."



Q: How did scientists come up with the name of dinosaurs?
from Mr. E., National Park, NJ, USA; October 15, 1998

A: Sir Richard Owen coined the word dinosaur, meaning "fearfully great lizard" in 1842. New dinosaurs are named by the paleontologist who determines that it represents a new genera. There are many different ways that they are named. Sometimes the dinosaur is given a name that describes something unusual about it (like Corythosaurus, which means helmet lizard, or Triceratops, which means 3-horned head). Some are named after the location where they are found (like Edmontosaurus or Albertosaurus). Some are named after a person (like Lambeosaurus).



Q: WHERE CAN I GET INFORMATION ABOUT THE MEGALODON. PARTICULARLY BOOKS? THANKS
from Robert H., BRIGHTON, EAST SUSSEX, ENGLAND; October 14, 1998

A: For a page on Megalodon, click here. I don't know of any books about it, but you should look in your local public library.



Q: How long does it take to go through the whole process of sedimentary fossilization?
from Samantha S., Chillicothe, Missouri, USA; October 14, 1998

A: Millions of years. For more information on how fossils form, click here.



Q: What is the taxonomic information on the ancient amphibian diplocaulus?
from Paul S., Houston, Texas, USA; October 14, 1998

A: Diplocaulus was a tetrapod, an amphibian, a labyrinthodont, a Lepospondyl, and a Nectridian. For some information on Diplocaulus, see the Dinosaur and Paleontology Dictionary (even though Diplocaulus was not a dinosaur).



Q: How did dinosaurs get extinct and what is the most hardest dinosaur name
from Stacey S, Waverly NY, USA; October 14, 1998

A: The Alvarex Asteroid Theory is a widely accepted theory that accounts for the large extinction at the end of the Cretaceous period. For details, see the sections on the "Alvarez Asteroid Theory" and "K-T Extinction" in the Dinosaur Dictionary in ZoomDinosaurs.com. Also read the chapter on "Extinction."

You'll have to pick the name that's hardest for you to say. Click here for a list of dinosaur names.



Q: Do you have any pictures of the Carcharodon megalodon
from David D., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; October 14, 1998

A: For some information on Caracharodon and other extinct sharks, click here. Only teeth of Megalodon have been found, but since they are so similar to those of the great white shark (only much larger), it is thought that Megalodon looked like a huge version of the great white shark.



Q: What did an Archaeopteryx eat, what was the climate it lived in,what groups did it belong to, and what were its needs?
from Blake H., Carthage, Missouri, USA; October 13, 1998

A: It was a bird (a carnivore and insectivore) that lived in a warm climate. For more sheet on Archaeopteryx, click here.



Q: What fossils does a Coelophysis have?
from UDONIS H., Gainesville, Florida, USA; October 13, 1998

A: Several hundred Coelophysis fossil skeletons have been found in Arizona, New Mexico, and perhaps Utah. Adults and juveniles have been found. For an information sheet on Coelophysis, click here.



Q: I am trying to find reference on a Megalancosaurus. Apparently it was a small tree dweller that might have evolved into birds. I've been unlucky at best in finding reference and I need a photo for an illustration that I am doing. Thanks.
from Beth C., Dayton, Ohio, USA; October 13, 1998

A: I don't have a drawing of Megalancosaurus. It was a reptile (a prolacertiform archosauromorph) from the late Triassic period. It had opposable digits and a prehensile tail, which is why it is thought to have been arboreal (living in trees). It also had a pointed snout. The Megalancosaurus hypothesis (that Megalancosaurus was the ancestor of birds) is one of the theories about the origin of birds. The bird-dinosaur theory is much stronger and more widely accepted.



Q: What do you think is the most logical explanation for the extinction of dinosaurs???. Can you find me some information on the Brontosaurus????
from Emily H., Silver Lake, WI, USA; October 13, 1998

A: The Alvarex Asteroid Theory is widely accepted. For details, see the sections on the "Alvarez Asteroid Theory" and "K-T Extinction" in the Dinosaur Dictionary in ZoomDinosaurs.com. Also read the chapter on "Extinction."

Brontosaurus is the obsolete name for Apatosaurus. For information on Apatosaurus, click here.



Q: What kind of information could you find for me on a Diplocaulus?
from Mindy S., Unity, Oregon, USA; October 12, 1998

A: Diplocaulus was not a dinosaur, but an early, extinct amphibian with a boomerang-shaped head. It dates from the Carboniferous to the early Permian period (about 270 million years ago). There's an entry on Diplocaulus in the Dinosaur Dictionary under "D."



Q: i am doing a report on coelophysis. do you have any info i can use?
from bb, ferndale, washington, USA; October 12, 1998

A: For an information sheet on Coelophysis, click here.



Q: What dinosaurs lived in Toronto?
from Hunter B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; October 12, 1998

A: I don't know of any dinosaurs found in Ontario. To see a page of dinosaurs from Canada, click here.



Q: I had assumed we held the record for the biggest plant-eater in the world in in Argentina, as well as the meat-eater: Giganotosaurus. But I've read there's another dino that seems to be, at least, longer: the Supersaurus. Which one is the winner of "The biggest one" award?
from Sandra L., Cutral-Có, Neuquén, Argentina; October 11, 1998

A: Argentinosaurus huinculensis was certainly a huge sauropod and may well be the biggest dinosaur, but it is only known from some vertebrae and leg bones. Supersaurus, another enormous sauropod, is only known from an enormous shoulder bone. I don't think that a truly accurate estimate of either one's size is possible until more fossils are found. When people ask me which one is biggest is give them a list of a few of the largest sauropods, but this tally is changing all the time as new discoveries are made.



Q: I need to do a report -- lots of details - about the megalodon. I can't find enough information. Can you help?
from Ray G., Philadelphia, PA, USA; October 11, 1998

A: For an information sheet on Megalodon, click here.



Q: Was Archaeopteryx a bird or a dinosaur?
from Devon K., Dunbar, PA, USA; October 11, 1998

A: Archaeopteryx was bird. From a cladistic viewpoint, since birds evolved from dinosaurs, birds are included in the clade dinosauria, just as people are techically apes.



Q: What was the smallest dinosaur?
from Sara S., Green Cove Springs, FL, USA; October 10, 1998

A: Compsognathus is the smallest known adult dinosaur.



Q: I heard that a therizinosaurus was found with feathers. Is this true?
from Donya Q., Marshall, VA, USA; October 9, 1998

A: Therizinosaurus is a very poorly known dinosaur - in fact, it was first thought to be a turtle. I've never heard of any Therizinosaurus fossils being found with feathers. For information on Therizinosaurus, see the Dinosaur Dictionary under "T."

Recently, some feathered dinosaurs have been found in China, including Caudipteryx, Sinosauropteryx, and Protarchaeopteryx.



Q: WHAT DO YOU CALL A T-REX IN TEXAS?
from ryan .d b., parkesburg, USA; October 9, 1998

A: Tyrannosaurus tex



Q: I need to gather as much proof as possible about the evidence about the Asteroid theory of extinction. Is the theory of volcanoes causing the extinction connected to the one about the asteroids? If so, how?
from Mira G., Cliffwood, NJ, USA; October 8, 1998

A: The late Cretaceous was a time of high volcanism. These eruptions added a lot of greenhouse gases and dust into the atmosphere, cooling the Earth. The additional environmental changes caused by an asteroid impact may have pushed many species over the edge, causing the K-T mass extinction.

For more information on the Alvarez Extinction Theory, click here.



Q: How many kinds of dinosaurs are there?
from Mrs. A's Class, National Park, New Jersey, USA; October 8, 1998

A: There are about 330 described dinosaur genera (and many more species). Every few months (sometimes weeks), a new species is unearthed (for recent finds, see Dino News).



Q: We are studying Egypt and we would like to know if anyone has ever found any traces at all of dinosaurs in Egypt or bones with Egyptian pottery around it! Thank You! BR
from Breezy R., Sulphur, LA, USA; October 8, 1998

A: Many dinosaurs have been found in Egypt, including: Aegyptosaurus, Bahariasaurus, Carcharodontosaurus, Dicraeosaurus, Erectopus, Majungasaurus, and Spinosaurus.

Dinosaurs lived from about 225 to 65 million years ago. People evolved about 200,000 years ago, almost 65 million years after the dinosaurs went extinct. Therefore, traces of people (like ancient pottery) are not found together with dinosaur fossils - see the chart below.
Dinosaur timeline




Q: have they infectious diseases ?
from David, Lima; October 7, 1998

A: Dinosaurs probably did get infectious diseases - every living thing does.



Q: Which were one of the biggest dinos?
from Stacy W., Sunny, CA, USA; October 7, 1998

A: See the section on Extreme dinosaurs in "All About Dinosaurs."



Q: what kind of food did the Dimetrodon eat??
from Zac C,, Vineland, NJ, USA; October 6, 1998

A: Dimetrodon was a carnivore with a huge head and mouth, large, powerful jaws, and two types of teeth - sharp canines and shearing teeth. It probably ate other pelycosaurs (its close relatives), insects, etc. It could leave its cold, sluggish state much earlier after sunrise than the pelycosaurs with no sails (such as Archaeothyris, Casea, Ophiacodon, and Varanosaurus) and catch and eat them. For more information on Dimetrodon, click here.



Q: Do you know how many teeth a T. Rex had?
from Harrison B., West Hartford, CT, USA; October 6, 1998

A: T. rex had about 60 teeth. For an information sheet on T. rex, click here.



Q: How do Camarasaurus defend themselves?
from Chris, Chicago, IL, USA; October 6, 1998

A: Although it was small for a sauropod, Camarasaurus was still huge (over 60 feet or 18 m long). Its size was its primary protection from predators. Also, it had a long, sharp claw on its inner toe. Its tail may have also been used to swat away predators, although this is uncertain. For an information sheet on Camarasaurus, click here.



Q: what is the smallest kind of dino
from Dustin W., Bakersfield, CA, USA; October 6, 1998

A: Compsognathus.



Q: How much did Amargasaurus weigh? How long was it?
from Donya Q., Marshall, VA, USA; October 6, 1998

A: Amargasaurus was about 33 feet (10 m) long. I have no reliable references to its weight which is very diffficult to estimate. For more information on Amargasaurus, click here.



Q: Was Utahraptor ostrommaysi built more like Velociraptor mongoliensis or Deinonychus?
from Daala R., Troy, VA, USA; October 6, 1998

A: Deinonychus. Velociraptor had a flatter snout. They were all dromaeosaurids with a similar body shape and a retractible, sickle-shaped, middle toe claw. Utahraptor was much bigger (about 20 feet long); Velociraptor was about 6 feet long and Deinonychus was about 10 feet long.



Q: Were Dinosaurs warmblooded or Coldblooded?
from Joshua C., China, Maine, USA; October 6, 1998

A: See the section on this topic in "Anatomy and Behavior."



Q: What was the biggest dinosaur?
from Thomas S., Detroit, MI, USA; October 6, 1998

A: See the section in "Extreme Dinosaurs."



Q: Is this dino the most recent dino Carcharodontosaurus if not what one is? What are some facts about the most recent dino?
from Brandon H, Sheridan, WY, USA; October 5, 1998

A: Carcharodontosaurus was first found in 1931 by Ernst Stromer von Reichenbach. In 1996, Paul Serano and his team found another Carcharodontosaurus in North Africa, even larger than the older specimen. For more information on Carcharodontosaurus, click here.

Many other dinosaurs have been found in the last few years. Some very recent finds include Scipionyx, Protarchaeopteryx, Caudipteryx, Unenlagia, Giganotosaurus, Sinosauropteryx, and many others. Also see the section on Dino News for updates.



Q: What kind of habitat does Euoplocephalus live in and what kind of shelter does he need?
from Ryan V., Charlotte, NC, USA; October 5, 1998

A: Euoplocephalus lived during the late Cretaceous Period, about 70-65 million in what is now Alberta, Canada. The climate was warmer than it is now, but the late Cretaceous was a time of high volcanism and the climate was cooling.

Euoplocephalus, like a turtle, had its shelter, a series of bony plates, on its back. Actually, it was protection from predators, not from the weather. Click here for more information on Euoplocephalus



Q: How do you estimate mass sizes of dinosaurs? I've just done an experiment involving water displacement and scale dinosaur models, Are there better methods and what inaccuracies are involved with water displacement method? I also need a mass estimate for cetiosaurus, mamenchisaurus, muttaburrasaurus and scelidosaurus?
from Jeremy D., Aukland, NZ; October 2, 1998

A: Water displacement is pretty accurate - you can determine the exact volume of water displaced by the model. The volume is mutiplied by the scale of the model and the estimated density of the animal to come up with an estimated weight.

The largest inaccuracy is introduced in estimating the density of the dinosaur. Different dinosaurs had very different densities. Some were relatively light per unit volume because of their hollow bones while others had dense, thick bones, making them much heavier per unit volume. I don't have reliable estimates of the weights you want.



Q: Which dinosaur was actually the biggest and meanest meat eater?
from Orin J., Sulphur, Louisiana, USA; October 2, 1998

A: Dinosaurs probably weren't "mean" and they didn't have any complicated emotions. They, like other reptiles, had simple brains. They may have been ferocious, especially when they were hungry or in other basic, instinctual modes. I would guess that T. rex was the most ferocious meat-eater. Although Carcharadontosaurus and Giganotosaurus were slightly taller, T. rex had a bigger brain (which can be the deadliest weapon of all), was more massive, and had more powerful teeth.



Q: What was the oldest dinosaur ever found? What was the most recent dino fossil ever found? Thank you and please answer as quickly as you can! TEACHER Approval
from Jessica W., Sulphur, Louisiana, USA; October 2, 1998

A: The oldest dinosaur found was Eoraptor - it is about 228 million years old. For more information on Eoraptor, click here.

The most recent fossil found is hard to determine. There are many digs going on all around the world every day, and many discoveries are made. The most exciting place right now is Liaoning Province, in northestern China , where many bird-like dinosaurs and early birds have been found lately. For more information on new finds, see the section on Dinosaur News.



Q: What is the real color of T-Rex? It was on my test and I didn't know! thank you!
from Kyle P., Sulphur, Louisiana, USA; October 2, 1998

A: No one knows what color dinosaur skin was. Some fossilized skin has been found, but only information on texture is preserved in the fossilization process.



Q: Y DID THE DINISORS DIE AND WAUT WAS THE DINISOR THAT HADITS SKINE STILL ON IT
from Philip A., Lincolnwood, IL, USA; October 2, 1998

A: Click here for a discussion on the Alvarez Extinction Theory. This theory states that a large asteroid, meteor, or comet hit the Earth 65 million years ago, causing huge atmospheric and geologic disruptions, leading to a mass extinction which killed the dinosaurs and many other species.

A few examples fossilized dinosaur skin have been found, including Tyrannosaurus rex and Scipionyx. For more details on dinosaur skin, click here.



Q: Does the Carcharodon megalodon still exist?
from ????; October 1, 1998

A: Probably not - but you never know. These ancient, giant sharks would probably have been seen by someone. For more information on Megalodon, click here.



Q: WE ARE STUDYING DINOSAURS AND WE NEED INFO ON MAMENCHISAURUS AND THE BRACHIOSAURUS. WE NEED THIS INFORMATION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE! THANK YOU, AND HAVE A NICE DAY! PS: DRIVE SAFELY!!!!
from JAW & JEB, Sulphur, Louisiana, USA; October 1, 1998

A: For information on Mamenchisaurus, go the Dinosaur Dictionary and look under M. For an information sheet on Brachiosaurus, click here.





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