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Zoom Dinosaurs
DINOSAUR QUESTIONS
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Questions from November 1999



Q: Why do dinosaurs have such long names?
from Lauren J., Winter Garden, FL, USA; December 1, 1999

A: That's just the way most paleontologists name them. A few have short names, like Drinker and Irritator. FOr more information on how dinosaurs are named, click here.



Q: Can you give me some references about modern methods, concerning the finding and excavating fossil-dinosaurs. My collueges and I are working for an exmination in biology dealing with dinosaurs. We know the most popular web sites about dinos but it wasn't possible for us to find any useful and easily accessible informations about modern techniques in dino-science. for any information we would be very greatful.
from Mark O., Austria; November 30, 1999

A: I don't know of other sites with this information. We have a short section on excavating fossils at: /subjects/dinosaurs/dinofossils/Excavating.shtml



Q: which was the most intellegent dinosaur?
from eunice h f, Cheraw, SC, USA; November 30, 1999

A: Probably the Troodontids, like Troodon.



Q: Can you tell me some things about the Glyptodont?
from ?; November 30, 1999

A: For information on the glyptodont (Genus Glyptodon), click here.



Q: Were Dinosaurs warm blooded or cold blooded
from nicole f, pocola, oklahoma, USA; November 30, 1999

A: Click here for information on possible metebolisms.



Q: Approxamently how many different types of dinosars are there?
from Emily W., VA, USA; November 29, 1999

A: Click here.



Q: When did the Stegosaurus become extint?
from Morgan W, West Jordan, Utah, USA; November 29, 1999

A: Stegosaurus went extinct about 140 million years ago. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: My daughter is in first grade and doing a report on plesiosaurs. She is interested in learning how they protected themselves.
from Anne O., Aurora, CO, USA; November 29, 1999

A: Plesiosaurs only method of defense was biting with their teeth. Swimming away was probably another method of dealing with attackers. For more information on Plesiosaurs, click here.



Q: how do oviraptors compare to the size of a human?
from Heather C., Westjordan, Utah, USA; November 28, 1999

A: Oviraptor was about 6 to 8 feet long (1.8 to 2.5 m) and weighed about 55 to 76 pounds (25 to 35 kg). This length included its long tail, so Oviraptor was smaller than a person and a lot lighter. For more information on Oviraptor, click here.



Q: What modern animals resemble dinosaurs?
from Alex B., Panorama City, CA, USA; November 28, 1999

A: Birds.



Q: Tell me how fossils of five extinct speicies were found and identifie them too and who found it?
from Eric H., South Surrey White Rock, British Columbia, Canada; November 28, 1999

A: For a list of dinosaurs (and other extinct animals) with information sheets (including who described them), click here.



Q: what plant was in the prehistoric life?
from ?; November 28, 1999

A: Many different plants lived in prehistoric times. For some of the plants that lived during the Mesozoic Era (when dinosuars lived), click here.



Q: How many States in the United States have named State dinosaurs
from Robert F., Kalamazoo, MI, USA; November 28, 1999

A: The following states have official state dinosaur fossils:
State Official Dinosaur (year it became official)
Colorado Stegosaurus stenops (1991)
Connecticut Eubrontes giganteus (an ichnogenus) (1991)
District of Columbia Capitalsaurus (June 10, 1998)
Maryland Astrodon johnstoni (1998)
Massachusetts Theropod footprints (1980)
Montana Maiasaura peeblesorum (1985)
New Jersey Hadrosaurus foulkii (1991)
South Dakota Triceratops prorsus
Texas Pleurocoelus (1997)
Utah Allosaurus fragilis (1988)
Wyoming Triceratops horridus (1994)




Q: What was the function of the easophagus?
from Shannon B., Northridge, CA, USA; November 27, 1999

A: I just answered this questions a few days ago. Scroll down.



Q: Can you give me lots of facts on the t-rex? I really need some answers, thanks!
from T. rex, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; November 27, 1999

A: For information on T. rex, click here.



Q: How long was the Breachiosaurus pregnat 2. does it have any relatives existing today? #3 and how many babies did it give birth to
from Breanna B, Allegany, USA; November 27, 1999

A: Brachiosaurus laid eggs - it did not give birth to live young. Brachiosaurus was a sauropod, a line of dinosaurs that were an evolutionary deadend. Other dinosaurs, however, probably gave rise to the birds. For more information on Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: HOW DOES THE VELOCIRAPTOR CARE FOR ITS BABIES
from randy u., Miami, Fla, USA; November 27, 1999

A: No one knows if Velociraptor cared for its young. For more information on Velociraptor, click here.



Q: I am doing a report on dinosaurs and I have to give information on dinosaur's eyes. Were there any specific characteristics I should include?
from Claire, Hickory, NC, USA; November 24, 1999

A: No fossilized dinosaur eyes have ever been found, so very little is known about their vision. The shape of the skull and eye placement is known, and tells you whether a particular genus of dinosaur had binocular vision or not.



Q: Dear Sir/Madam, I am doing a report on the triceritops i need its picture and what its baby looks like please help me!!!
sincerly ,
ashley s.

from ashley s., Marion. Ohio, USA; November 25, 1999

A: For information on Triceratops and a picture, click here. I've never seen a reconstruction of a young Triceratops (except as a dinosaur toy), but young animals generally have a disproportionately large head (as compared to an adult) and probably smaller horns and frill.



Q: Were any dinosaurs hermaprodic (having both male and female sexual organs)?
from Claire N, Hickory, NC, USA; November 24, 1999

A: No fossilized dinosaur reproductive organs have ever been found.



Q: How many teeth did the Stegosaurus have and how sharp were they?
from Kailey Olson and Nichole Crooks, Bottineau, North Dakota, USA; November 24, 1999

Stegosaurus toothA: Stegosaurus had a lot of small, flat, leaf-shaped teeth. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here. For more information on dinosaur teeth, click here.



Q: Are there any marine dinosaurs???
from Ellen R., batemans Bay, NSW, Australia; November 24, 1999

A: No, but there were many other marine reptiles during the time of the dinosaurs, like plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs, nothosaurs, mosasaurs, and crocodilians.



Q: How can a paleontologists tell the size of a dinosaur from just one bone? What other information can they learn by looking at only a few bones? Please reply by November 26 , 1999 because many people have reports and homework to do. Also Happy Thanksgiving
from Erica E., Stamford, CT, USA; November 24, 1999

A: A single bone can tell you roughly how big a dinosaur was, but some bones tell you more than others. For example, a leg bone tells you more about size than a toe bone), but both give you scale information. If you find a femur (a thigh bone) that is 2 feet long, you have a dinosaur whose upper leg was the same size as a person's upper leg. If the femur was 8 feet long, you have a huge dinosaur, about the size of Barosaurus (which was 85 feet long).

Bones can tell you the dinosaur's stance (did it walk on two or four feet, did it hold its tail up, etc.). Bones also record many diseases (like arthritis and gout), which some dinosaurs had, and serious injuries that the dinosaur suffered from (like broken limbs or tooth marks). They can also tell you how big the dinosaur's brain was. Other things, like muscle attachments, and nerve pathways can also be determined by bone structure. Whether or not the bone was solid tells you how light orheavy the animals was (hollow-bones indicate a lighter dinosaur, and a faster runner)



Q: who was Gertie???please answer soon!have project due!
from ?; November 24, 1999

A: Gertie was the first animated dinosaur. Gertie was drawn by the newspaper cartoonist Winsor McCay, beginning in 1913. McCay drew Gertie because his fellow cartoonist, George McManus, bet him that he couldn't. Gertie was based on the sauropod Brontosaurus (now known as Apatosaurus). McCay's short animated film, called Winsor McCay America's Greatest Cartoonist and Gertie, was a great success.



Q: If dinosaurs are reptiles, and if they are part of the archosaurs, what features of their skulls, or their egg structures define them differently than modern day crocodiles and birds?
from Alanna B, Sacramento, USA; November 24, 1999

A: Birds, dinosaurs and crocodilians are archosaurs (and also reptiles). They are all diapsids, with similar basic skull structures (two holes in the rear upper part of their skulls plus two holes behind the eyes). Their eggs also have a similar basic structure, since they're all amniotes (animals whose eggs have a membrane that keeps the egg from drying out). One obvious structure that differentiates dinosaurs from crocodilians is their leg structure; dinosaur legs went almost straigh down from the body but crocodilian legs sprawl out to the sides. Dinosaurs and birds are very similar structurally.



Q: Our class is doing a project on dinosaurs. I was assigned the Teratosaurus. I have found that it is not a dinosaur. It is an early reptile. Can you tell me more about it? Do you know where I can find a picture or a description of one?
from Elizabeth N., Melrose, Mass, USA; November 23, 1999

A: Teratosaurus was a thecodont, from the Triassic period. For information on Teratosaurus, click here.



Q: did the dinosaurs travel in herds????
from ?; November 23, 1999

A: Some did, like Coelophysis. This is known because hundreds of fossils were found together at one location; this was obviously not a solitary dinosaur.



Q: what are the gastroliths? what is their function? are there any animals alive today that use them?
from ?; November 23, 1999

A: Gastroliths are stones that some animals swallow in order to facilitate digestion of tough food. Many dinosaurs used gastroliths. Some modern-day animals that use gastroliths are birds and crocidiles. For more information on gastroliths, click here.



Q: what are four things u can learn about a dinoaur from its footprints?
from ?; November 23, 1999

A: The size of its feet, the approximate length of its legs, what general type of dinosaur it is, its stride length (if more than one footprint is found), and its approximate speed (with more than one footprint). For more information on dinosaur locomtion, click here and scroll down to the section on dinosaur tracks.



Q: Could we please have any information on the dinosaurs;Ichthosaurs and Coelophysis? Especially on their behavior with other dinosaurs and breeding but we would still like anything else on them. Thank-you
from Kyra. N, Colac, Victoria, Australia; November 23, 1999

A: For information on the aquatic reptiles called Ichthyosaurs, click here. For information on the dinosaur Coelophysis, click here. Nothing is known about how Coelophysis reproduced.



Q: How many Styracosaurus's were in the United States in 1913?
from NAME, CITYSTATE, USA; November 23, 1999

A: Styracosaurus was named in 1913 by paleontologist Lawrence Lambe from a specimen (of the genus S. albertensis) found in Alberta, Cananda. The only other genus of Styracosaurus known at that time was S. sphenocerus named by Cope, in 1889, from fossils in the western USA - but this is a dubious genus, and may not be Styracosaurus at all. So the answer is probably that there were no known Styracosaurus fossils the USA in 1913. Decades later, Gilmore found S. ovatus in Montana (which he named in 1930).



Q: can I have a picture of a Ryamphorhrchus.
from Katrina N., Fair Lawn, NJ, USA; November 23, 1999

A: For a picture and information on Rhamphorhynchus, click here.



Q: what is the seath star theory?
from shannon o., northridge, ca, USA; November 23, 1999

A: The death star theory refers to the fact that mass extinctions are periodic, and may be caused by the Earth's passing through a cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) every 26 million years. Some people have hypothesized that there is a yet-to-be-discovered dark star or perhaps a planet (called, appropriately enough, Nemesis) orbiting in the outer reaches of our solar system. This body disrupts the Oort cloud (one every 26 million years), sending comets into the inner parts of the solar system, some of which hit Earth and cause mass extinctions.



Q: What is a carnivore and what is a herbivore?
from Susan L., Paterson, NJ, USA; November 23, 1999

A: Carnivores are meat-eaters; herbivores are plant-eaters. Click here for more information.



Q: what dinosuars lived during the jurassic period
from bryce o, provo, UT, USA; November 23, 1999

A: Click on the following for early Jurassic period dinosaurs, middle Jurassic dinosaurs, and late Jurassic dinosaurs.



Q: i would like some information on platybelodon shovel head.
from Mike P., kenosha, WI, USA; November 23, 1999

A: For information on Platybelodon, click here.



Q: What's are 2 disadvantages of being endothermic in desert conditions? {it's endothermic, not ectothermic} being respond soon, thanks! :)
from Miriam; November 22, 1999

A: Endothermic organisms generate their own heat to maintain body temperatures. A huge disadvantages in a desert would be the problem of finding enough food to live; endotherms need a lot more calories than ectotherms do, just to maintain their body temperature. Since it has to eat much more than ectotherms, it must eat and expose itself to danger or expend even more energy chasing prey. If an herbivore, it will spend most of its time eating, when ectotherms could be hiding (in burrows for example); if a carnivore, it will expend a huge amount of energy chasing scarce prey. A second disadvange is that in order to keep cool in times of extreme heat, you sweat or pant and lose precious water.



Q: What evidence do scientists have that large bodies from space have contacted the earth? {what's a good page for that and explains it good?}
from Cindy, USA; November 22, 1999

A: for information on the possible evidence left by asteroid impacting the Earth, click here The section called "CHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY" has evidence supporting the theory.



Q: WHAT WEBSITE THAT I COULD LOOK UP TO FIND INFORMATION ABOUT THE TRACHODON ? BUT I NEED IT IN FRENCH
from J.S., LAVAL, Quebec, Canada; November 22, 1999

A: I don't know of any Trachodon pages in French. For information on Trachodon in English, click here.



Q: Where can I go to see a page about the Parasaurolophus crest?
from Renee; November 22, 1999

A: I don't of any pages devoted to the crest alone. For a page on the entire dinosaur, click here.



Q: Do you know were I can go to see a page about the K-T boundary?
from Loraine, USA; November 22, 1999

A: for information on the K-T layer, click here and scroll down to the section called "CHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY ."



Q: Did dinosaurs migrate??? What evidence is there to support the answer?? {please respond soon}
from Tianna, CA, USA; November 22, 1999

A: They may have, but the answer is not at all certain since there is no definitive evidence. The best fossil evidence so far is finding bonebeds of the same species of dinosaur at different locations, as though herds migrated over a great distance. Some paleontologists are convinced that some plant-eaters did migrate in order to find food and reproduce. Others are not convinced; they argue that since the Mesozoic Era was a relatively warm time, dinosaurs would not have needed to migrate.



Q: Five important facts about Australian dinosaurs
from Scot D., Kingsport, Tennessee, USA; November 19, 1999

A: For a page on Australian dinosaurs, click here.



Q: HOW CAN I FIND OUT ABOUT FOSSILS AND HOW THEY FORM?
from ?; November 22, 1999

A: See this page.



Q: Why are Dinosaurs reptiles
from ASHLEY H, Webter, NY, USA; November 22, 1999

A: See the definition of reptiles.



Q: was t-rex's vision based on movment.
from Lex T., Lafayette, Louisiana, USA; November 21, 1999

A: No one knows much about T. rex's vision with much certainty. No fossilized dinosaur eye tissue has been found, so very little is known it. T. rex had large visual lobes in its brain that processed visual information. T. rex also had depth perception (since both eyes faced forwards on the front of its skull, and not placed on the sides).



Q: What was the function of the Parasaurolophus crest?
from ?; November 21, 1999

A: No one knows for sure; it may have been used to produce low-frequency, foghorn-like sounds, enhance its sense of smell, and/or for courtship displays. For information on Parasaurolophus, click here.



Q: What is the function of the oesophagus and how did it work??? Please respond soon {huge report}. Thanks.
from Carla, USA; November 21, 1999

A: The esophagus is essentially a muscular tube that connects the mouth with the stomach in animals. Nothing is known about the dinosuar's esophagus.



Q: Hi!I am doing a project on the Diplodocus,and I cannot find any information on the structure of the dinosaur.I was wondering if you could give me some information (plus a picture(s)) om the structure or at least tell me of a link or site in which I could find this information. THANK YOU !!!!!!
from Marie Ann, Hartford, CN, USA; November 21, 1999

A: There's a good page at Columbia University, but it's slow to load and doesn't always come in. Scroll down towards the bottom for nice drawings of Diplodocus bones and a skull. For my page on Diplodocus, click here.



Q: What's the difference between endothermic and ectothermic?
from Sandra; November 21, 1999

A: See this page.



Q: What are 2 advantages and disadvantages of being ectothermic in desert conditions??
from Gladys, CA, USA; November 21, 1999

A: Ectotherms are animals whose internal temperature changes with the environment. They rely upon the external temperature and their behavior (like sunning themselves) to regulate their body temperature. Amphibians, most fish, and many reptiles are ectothermic. Some advantages are: 1. Huge energy savings (you don't have to maintain a high body temperature like we do and can get by on a let less food than endotherms do) and 2. Since they have to eat less, a lot of other body parts can be simpler and smaller (for example, the stomach can be smaller and simpler). Some disdvantages are: 1. During cold times (like night) ectotherms are sluggish and susceptible to attack and 2. During times of extreme heat, ectotherms must protect themselves from the heat.



Q: How might a climate change affected the dinosaurs?
from Taylor M.C., USA; November 20, 1999

A: A large climate change could cause species who couldn't adapt to the chamge to go extinct. Those who could adapt, would, but those species would have an altered gene pool.



Q: What was different about the vision of T-rex?
from NAME, USA; November 20, 1999

A: Different from what? T. rex had large visual lobes in its brain that processed visual information. T. rex also had depth perception (since both eyes faced forwards on the front of its skull, and not placed on the sides), but it was not the only dinosaur that had depth perception.



Q: What is the Death Star Theory?
from Marcela, USA; November 20, 1999

A: It refers to the fact that mass extinctions are periodic, and may be caused by the Earth's passing through a cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) every 26 million years. Some people have hypothesized that there is a yet-to-be-discovered dark star or perhaps a planet (called, appropriately enough, Nemesis) orbiting in the outer reaches of our solar system. This body disrupts the Oort cloud (one every 26 million years), sending comets into the inner parts of the solar system, some of which hit Earth and cause mass extinctions.



Q: what was t-rexs enviroment? please answer right now report do mon have to finish tonight!!
from leanne, MASS, USA; November 20, 1999

A: For information on T. rex's environment, click here.



Q: How were the teeth of Triceratops special??
from Felisha; November 20, 1999

A: For information on Triceratops teeth, click here and scroll down to the section on DIET AND TEETH.



Q: What was interesting or different about the syntarsus?
from Caitlin U, West Jordan, Utah, USA; November 20, 1999

A: It's ankle bones were unusual. Also, some species had double crests (the ones from North America), some did not (the ones from Africa). It was also a herding dinosaur. For more information on Syntarsus, click here.



Q: What does the word cretaceous mean??
from ?; November 20, 1999

A: Cretaceous comes from the Latins word cretaceus, meaning "chalk," since this period was defined from chalky layers found in SE England.



Q: What does Orviraptor mean?
from Alicia, Palmdale; November 20, 1999

A: Egg thief. For more information on Oviraptor, click here.



Q: What is "shocked quartz"? Why is it so important?? Please repsond soon, I have a big report. Thanks.
from Jennah C., USA; November 20, 1999

A: For information on shocked quartz, click here and scroll down to the section on "CHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY ."



Q: Why were the earliest mammals nocturnal?
from Chase J.; November 20, 1999

A: No one has any evidence that this is true. Some people assume that the dinosaurs were diurnal (most active during the day) on the assumption they were cold-blooded. Given this assumption, one can further assume that mammals might benefit from being nocturnal (most active at night) since this would help keep them from becoming dinosaur food. There are plenty of problems assuming that all dinosaurs were "cold-blooded." Even though dinosaurs were reptiles, some dinosaurs may have been "warm-blooded," especially the small, bird-like theropods. They would have been able to hunt at night quite well. It is more likely that some early mammals were nocturnal and some were diurnal and that some dinosaurs were nocturnal and some were diurnal.



Q: What is the difference between Ornithischia and Saurischia??
from Dorian; November 20, 1999

A: Click here.



Q: How were small animals able to hunt?
from Steph, CA, USA; November 20, 1999

A: The same way small animals hunt today, using their teeth and claws.



Q: What modern animals resemble dinosaurs?
from Jasmine; November 20, 1999

A: Birds.



Q: What are 3 explanations of what happened to the dinosaurs?
from Katie B., Los Angeles, USA; November 20, 1999

A: Click here for the Alvarez Asteroid Theory and here, for other theories.



Q: Were dinosaurs good parents?
from Miguel, West lake, USA; November 20, 1999

A: Some were (like Maiasaura), and some weren't (like the sauropods, perhaps). For most dinosaurs, we just don't know.



Q: How long were dinosaurs on Earth?
from Maggie H., USA; November 20, 1999

A: The evolved about 230 million years ago and went extinct 65 million years ago, so they were here for about 165 million years.



Q: What is a sauropod?
from Vanessa H., USA; November 20, 1999

A: Sauropods were plant-eating Saurischian dinosaurs. They had long necks, long tails, a small head and bunt teeth. For more information on sauropods, click here.



Q: In what different climates did the dinosaurs live in?
from Maggie H., Seal Beach, CA, USA; November 20, 1999

A: Different dinosaurs lived in different climates. The Triassic period. for example, was a time when much of the land on Earth was dry and hot, so early dinosaurs were adapted to the desert-like conditions of inland Pangaea. The climate of the Jurassic period was still warm, but not nearly as dry, since Pangaea was breaking up. The climate of the Cretaceous period varied. Also, the equatorial regions were warmer than regions nearer the poles. There were swamps, deserts, and wooded areas; different dinosaurs inhabited different habitats.



Q: What would be the family name for a Protoceratops?
from Nick B., Alexandria, KY, USA; November 19, 1999

A: Protoceratops belonged to the family Protoceratopsidae (meaning "first horned faces"). Other members of this family include Montanoceratops, Bagaceratops, Protoceratops Leptoceratops, Microceratops, and Notoceratops. For more information on Protoceratops, click here. For a list of the major dinosaur families, click here.



Q: WHAT is the meaning of it's the name Tyrannosaurs
from Aaron, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; November 19, 1999

A: Tyrannosaurus means "Tyrant king." For more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: Important Facts about Australian Dinosaurs
from Bryan D., Kingsport, Tennessee, USA; November 19, 1999

A: For a page on Australian dinosaurs, click here.



Q: what's the shark's prehistoric name?
from Savannah, Kingsport, Tennessee, USA; November 19, 1999

A: There were many prehistoric sharks, including Cladoselache, Megalodon, Hybodus, and Stethacanthes. For moreinformation on extinct sharks, click here.



Q: Where was Acanthopholis's fossil found?
from Maika .B, St. Cloud, Florida, USA; November 19, 1999

A: Acanthopholis fossils were found in England. For more information on Acanthopholis, click here.



Q: WHEN IN GEOLOGICAL TIME DID THE CENOZOIC ERA TAKE VPLACE AND HOW LONG DID IT LAST?
from VICTOR D., NORCROSS, GEORGIA, USA; November 19, 1999

A: The Cenozoic Era lasted from 65 million years ago (the end of the Mesozoic Era) until now. For a chart of geologic time, click here.



Q: is it true the t rex is a scavenger? i dont think so, but from what i have been hearing on the discovery channel they believe he is a scavenger what do you think?
from toni b., lumberton, nc, USA; November 19, 1999

A: Although there is a bit of debate about this in paleontology circles, T. rex was probably both. Most meat-eater are. Robert Bakker argues that T. rex was mostly a scavenger, but the majority of paleontologists thank it was predominantly a predator who scavenged occasionally. For more information on T. rex's diet, click here.



Q: Can you give me some information on sharks and what they evolved from and how it happened?
from Ben E., Leeds, Yorkshire, England, UK ,Europe; November 17, 1999

A: For a page on extinct sharks and shark evolution, click here.



Q: How many words of 2 to 5 letters can you make using the letters in dinosaur?? Because dinosaur doesn't contain 2 identical letters of any type (for example, 2 a's) don't use the same letter more than once per word.
from JIMMY L., Georgia, USA; November 17, 1999

A: I'll see. There are probably a lot more - what am I missing?
2 3 4 5
in, on, no, so, or, an, do, id, ad, us, is, as, us ran, rod, run, rid, and, son, sin, sad, sod, din, nor, nod, oar, our soar, said, raid, dour, ruin, rain, sand, rind, darn, oars, raid round, sound, drain, rains, ruins, darns, rinds, raids, rosin, nadir




Q: I am doing a school project on the Diplodocus Dinosaur and I need some information on its reproduction and how it took care of its babies.
from Mary B., Hartford, CT, USA; November 17, 1999

A: Neither eggs nor hatchlings of Diplodocus have been found, so nothing is known about parental care of the young, but they probably hatched from eggs. For more information on Diplodocus, click here.



Q: My 7th grade class is studing the T-Rex and we don't know if he is a scavanger or a preditor? Could you please help us in telling us?
from Jessie H., Overland Park, Kansas, USA; November 17, 1999

A: Although there is a bit of debate about this in paleontology circles, T. rex was probably both. Most meat-eater are. Robert Bakker argues that T. rex was mostly a scavenger, but the majority of paleontologists thank it was predominantly a predator who scavenged occasionally. For more information on T. rex's diet, click here.



Q: What types of dinosaurs eat only meat? What types of dinosaurs eat only grass? Which types eat both?
from Josh T., St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada; November 17, 1999

A: See this page.



Q: Where did dinosaurs or general animals evolve from? Why do some animals not evolve?
from Ben E., Leeds, England, USA; November 17, 1999

A: For a page on the evolution of the dinosaurs, click here. For chart that outlines geologic time and gives you an overview of evolution, click here.



Q: Can Your give me imformation on all the dinosaurs found in ,99 ?
from Brent P., Winner, New Caledonia, USA; November 17, 1999

A: Dinosaurs found in 1999 probably haven't been excavated enough for the paleontologists to announce yet. Recent dinosaur discoveries are listed in our "Dinosaur News" section.



Q: Between what hours of the day should i ask you questions?
from BRITTANY M. B., CLIFTON, NJ, USA; November 17, 1999

A: You can mail questions any time. I read them whenver I can and answer as many as I can. I get far too many to answer all of them, though.



Q: Can you tell me what plant life lived at the time when the sauroposeiden lived?
from BRITTANY M. B., CLIFTON, NJ, USA; November 17, 1999

A: Sauroposeidon lived during the mid-Cretaceous period. For plants that lived during the Cretaceous period, click here.



Q: I am doing a research project on the Muttaburrasaurus for my 6th grade science teacher, Mrs. Wilson. I am having difficulty finding sites and information on this perticular dinosaur. Could you show me at least three different links to help me with my project. I would also appreciate it if those links had pictures of this dinosaur. I would also like to know what vegitation was there during that time period. What were some of the unusual adaptions that this dinosaur developed to survive? I would appreciate it greatly if you would get my information by December 2nd, 1999. Thank You Very Much!
from Kathleen C. S., Pearland, TX, USA; November 16, 1999

A: For information on Muttaburrasaurus, click here. For information on the plants that lived during the Cretaceous period (when Muttaburrasaurus lived), click here. You can also look up general information on the Cretaceous period, and other dinosaurs that lived in Australia during the early Cretaceous. Some unusual adaptations were its big thumb spikes, shear-like teeth and the big, bony bump on its snout (which may have been associated with its sense of smell or its ability to make sounds).



Q: how fast can an ostrich run
from Zachary, edgewood, N.M., USA; November 16, 1999

A: Ostriches can run up to 43 mph (70 kph). For more information on ostriches, click here.



Q: what are some of the animals names and pictures from the cambrian era
from Amber t, fairbanks, alaska, USA; November 16, 1999

A: The Cambrian period was also called the "Age of Trilobites." All of the modern-day phyla developed during that time (540 to 500 million years ago). For details, see the chart of geologic time, and scroll down to the Cambrian period.



Q: What is the t-rexs nickname. thunder lizard
from Samantha R., Cresent City, IL, USA; November 16, 1999

A: Tyrannosaurus rex's nicknames are T. rex and "King of the Dinosaurs." The dinosaur nicknamed "Thunder Lizard" was Brontosaurus, the old name for Apatosaurus.



Q: What are the different kinds of dinosaurs.
from Michle M; November 16, 1999

A: For a list of the major dinosaur families, click here. For a list of all known dinosaurs, click here.



Q: What was the first dinosaur? could there still be some alive today?
from Morgan, TX, USA; November 16, 1999

A: The earliest-known dinosaurs were found recently in Madagascar. For more information on them, click here.



Q: do you have any info on the plesiosaur?
from Natalie, auckland, nz; November 16, 1999

A: For information on plesiosaurs, click here.



Q: Please provide me with a detailed background on the Wooly Mamouth?
from NAME, CITYSTATE, USA; November 16, 1999

A: For information on the woolly mammoth, click here. For a woolly mammoth printout, click here.



Q: Who invented the term dinosaur.
from Morticia A., NJ, USA; November 16, 1999

A: Richard Owen. For more information, see the faq above.



Q: what is the sauroposeidens main food source
from brittany b., clifton, nj, USA; November 15, 1999

A: Sauroposeidon was a mid-Cretaceous plant-eater that probably ate leaves from tree-tops. For information on plants that lived during the Cretaceous period, click here. For information on Sauroposeidon, click here.



Q: How long and how big are a dinosaur's tooth.
from Nat B and Jen L, Casino, N.S.W., Australia; November 15, 1999

A: They varied a lot. For information on dinosaur teeth, click here.



Q: I want information on the pterandon dinosaur
from AT, USA; November 15, 1999

A: For information on Pteranodon (not a dinosaur, but closely related to them), click here.



Q: What is a ornithosuchus, and where can I find extensive information on it?
from Julie S., Isla Vista, CA, USA; November 15, 1999

A: Ornithosuchus was a Triassic period thecodont, not a dinosaur. For more information on Ornithosuchus, click here.



Q: How tall is the brachiosaurus?
from felicia h.; November 15, 1999

A: Brachiosaurus was about 40-50 feet tall (12-16 m). For more information on Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: Was the woolymamoth a dinosaur.
from Y. C., Hewitt, MI, USA; November 15, 1999

A: No, it was a mammal. For more information on the woolly mammoth, click here.



Q: what layer of rock was the Sauroposeiden Proteles found in oklahoma? (the paleontologists found it in november)
from Brittany B., Clifton, NJ, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Albian, the layer about 110 million years old, from the mid-Cretaceous period. For more information on Sauroposeiden, click here.



Q: Did dinosaurs travel in herds?
from Marcela, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Some did, as evidenced by bonebeds, large collections of fossils found together.



Q: why arent stegosaurus and allosaurus living today
from david d., toledo, ohio, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Because they went extinct; they couldn't adapt to environmental changes, disease, or tough competetion. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here. For more information on Allosaurus, click here.



Q: What is the K-T boundary and what was found there?
from Mely, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Click here.



Q: What are gastroliths? What is/was their function? Are there any mammals alive today that use them?
from Monica, USA; November 14, 1999

A: For information on gastroliths, click here and scroll down to the section on plant-eaters. Yes, many living animals use them (like turkeys).



Q: What 4 things can be learned about a dinosaur from his footprints?
from Monica, USA; November 14, 1999

A: See this page on dinosaur locomotion: /subjects/dinosaurs/anatomy/Locomotion.shtml



Q: What evidence do scientists have that large bodies from space have contacted the Earth?
from Monica, USA; November 14, 1999

A: See this page: /subjects/dinosaurs/extinction/Asteroid.html



Q: Why is archaeopteryx so important?
from Mely, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Because it is the earliest-known bird. For more information on Archaeopteryx, click here.



Q: Who was What evidence suggests the dinosaurs were warm blooded? Please respond soon, I have a report and these questions are hard. Thanks.
from Mely, USA; November 14, 1999

A: See this page: /subjects/dinosaurs/anatomy/Blood.shtml



Q: What was the function of the Parasaurolophus crest?
from Marcela B., Los Angeles, CA, USA; November 14, 1999

A: It may have been used to make deep sounds. For more information on Parasaurolophus, click here.



Q: What does "Oviraptor" mean?
from Marcela, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Egg thief. For more information on Oviraptor, click here.



Q: How did an Allosaurus and Stegosaurus protect themselves?
from David D., Toledo, OH, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Allosaurus had many sharp teeth and claws. Stegosaurus has few defenses; it's plates may have given it a bit of protection from predators, but running away was probably its best option. For more information on Allosaurus, click here. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: i am doing a report on the stegosaurus and i desperately need to know what kind of habitat they lived in and what kind of fossils were found when they did find some!!! HELP!!!
from alison f., Detroit, MI, USA; November 14, 1999

A: Stegosaurus fossils include: 2 partial fossils (for S. Armatus), a hip bone (for S. affinis), teeth (for S. madagascariensis), and a complete skeleton plus extra braincases and some other bones (for S. tenops). During the late Jurassic period, when Stegosaurus lived, the climate was warm and moist and the sea levels high. There were vast flooded areas, temperate and subtropical forests, and coral reefs. The extensive water moderated the strong seasonality For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: My favorite paleontologist is Robert Bakker.I would like to know where Robert Bakker was born, where he went to school, and where does he teach now?
from Collin, Buford, GA, USA; November 13, 1999

A: Bakker is the curator of Tate Museum in Casper, Wyoming and at the Paleontology Foundation, Dr. Robert Bakker Learning Center, in Glenrock, Wyoming. He was born in 1945, but I don't known where, or where he went to school.



Q: Can you name some dinosaurs with crests
from Tim S., Winsford, England; November 13, 1999

A: Many dinosaurs had crests, including Dilophosaurus, Corythosaurus, Lambeosaurus, Saurolophus, Parasaurolophus, and many more.



Q: WHY DON'T YOU HAVE WANNANOSAURUS AS ONE OF THE SMALLEST DINOSAURS? WASN'T IT EVEN SMALLER THAN COMPSOGNATHUS?
from LEO S, NY, NY, USA; November 13, 1999

A: Wannanosaurusis only known from a partial skull, so its size estimates vary widely and aren't too reliable, but Compsognathus is known from two skeletons and is quite reliable. I had just put in the three smallest, reliably-measured dinosaurs, but I've added Wannanosaurus to the list.



Q: On your Allosaurus information sheet, you wrote that it lived in the late Jurassic period, 152 to 135 million years ago. However, the Jurassic period ended 144 million years ago, and this means that the period Allosaurus lived was split about halfway by the end of the Jurassic.
from Jimmy L., Georgia, USA; November 12, 1999

A: I've found a better estimate of when Allosaurus lived: from the Kimmeridgian age to Tithonian age, about 154 million to 144 million years ago.



Q: What other things lived during dinosaur times?
from Lindsey P., Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, USA; November 12, 1999

A: Lots of things lived during hte Mesozoic Era, including, plesiosaurs, nothosaurs, ichthyosaurs, pterosaurs, early crocodilians, and many other reptiles. There were also early birds, early, small mammals, many fish, invertebrates, amphibians, and lots of plants, like seed ferns, ferns, club mosses, conifers, horsetails, and early flowering plants.



Q: Where can I find information about the Scaphonyx dinosaur?
from Susan B., Vincennes, IN, USA; November 12, 1999

A: I've added Scaphonyx (a rhyncosaur, not a dinosaur) to the Paleontology Dictionary.



Q: How are dinosaurs related to reptiles?
from Kerri - Lyn L., Smithfield, Rhode Island, USA; November 12, 1999

A: Dinosaurs are reptiles.

A cladogram of reptilia

Reptilia cladogram




Q: How many theeth do dinosaurs have. Did they eat their own kind.
from Arrmond,p, Escondido, CA, USA; November 12, 1999

A: It varied widely. Some, like Gallimimus and Ornithomimus, had no teeth. T. rex had 50 to 60 thick, conical teeth. The dinosaurs with the most teeth were the hadrosaurs (the duck-billed dinosaurs), which had up to 960 cheek teeth.

For more information on Dinosaur teeth, click here.

Some dinosaurs probably preyed upon their own kind; many reptiles do.



Q: Does anyone have a picture of a kronosaurus queenslandicus? If so could you please put it on your site?
from Mark B., Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; November 11, 1999

A: For Kronosaurus, click here.



Q: What was the behavior of the baryonyx dinosaur? Did it travel in herds, nurture its young, have any nests or eggs been found?
from Gil C., Downers Grove, IL, USA; November 11, 1999

A: No Baryonyx bone beds have been found, so it is unknown wheteher or not it traveled in herds. Neither eggs, nests, nor hatchlings have been found, so its parental behavior is unknown. For information on Baryonyx, click here.



Q: How did T-Rex get it's name?
from Ty & Ry, CA, USA; November 11, 1999

A: Tyrannosaurus rex was named in 1905 by paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn. Tyrannosaurus rex means "tyrant lizard king." For more information on T. rex, click here.



Q: WHAT DINOSAURS HAVE BEEN FOUND IN NEW ZEALAND?
from Natalie w., Auckland, New Zealand; November 11, 1999

A: None that I know of, but the mosasaur Tylosaurus was found there. For other fossils from that area, click here.



Q: HOW TO MAKE A 3-D DINOSAURS
from ?; November 10, 1999

A: For a 3-D dinosaur project, click here.



Q: What speed did T REX walk at?
from JEFF A, RICHMOND HILL, Ont, Cananda; November 10, 1999

A: For a page on T. rex's locomotion, click here\.



Q: Kentrosaurus and Centrosaurus mean the same thing but refer to 2 different dinosaurs. Are there any other names like this??
from Jimmy L., Georgia, USA; November 10, 1999

A: Yes, plenty. Barosaurus, Lurdusaurus, and Epachthosaurus all mean "heavy lizard." Dinosaurus, Dimodosaurus, and Tarbosaurus mean "terrible lizard." Dromaeosaurus and Dromicosaurus mean "swift lizard." Shunosaurus and Szechuanosaurus mean "Sichuan [, China] lizard." There are probably lots of others.



Q: WHAT DOES SAUROPOD MEAN? WHAT IS TWO INTRESTING FACTS ABOUT BRACHIOSAURUSES?
from Jana C., Red Oak, Texas, USA; November 10, 1999

A: Sauropod means "Lizard-Footed." For interesting facts about Brachiosaurus, click here.



Q: What is the oldest dinosaur?
from Andria N, Grayling, Michigan, USA; November 10, 1999

A: Recent finds in Madagascar are the oldest, about 230 million years old..



Q: What is the origin of the word 'earth"
from Denise T., Cambridge; November 10, 1999

A: Its from the middle english word erthe, and the old English word eorthe (according to my Random House Unabridged DIctionary).



Q: how did the stegosaurus protect its young
from helen s., adelaide, south australia, australia; November 10, 1999

A: No one knows if Stegosaurus even cared for its young. If may have simply laid the eggs and wandered off. For more information on Stegosaurus, click here.



Q: Has their been any recent findings on dinosaurs?
from Amanda K., Oswego, NY, USA; November 10, 1999

A: For recent dinosaur finds in the news, click here.



Q: What is the difference between reptiles and dinosaurs? ASAP
from William P., Springfield, Illinois, USA; November 9, 1999

A: Dinosaurs were reptiles. Reptiles (meaning "to creep") are a group of animals that have scales (or modified scales), breathe air, and usually lay eggs. The term reptile is loosely defined in everyday English to mean scaly, cold-blooded, egg-laying animals. In cladistics (a way of classifying life forms), the reptiles are more strictly defined and include the descendants of the most recent common ancestor of the turtles, lepidosaurs (lizards, snakes, tuataras), and archosaurs (crocodilians, dinosaurs, and birds). The maintenance of body temperature (cold- vs. warm-blooded) is not a factor in this classification, but skull and egg structure are.



Q: what is a meat eating dinasour called and a leaf eating dinasour
from billy, riverside, illinois, USA; November 9, 1999

A: The meat-eating dinosaurs were theropods (a type of saurischian dinosaur). There are many different groups pf plant-eaters, including sauropods and prosauropods (types of saurischian dinosaurs), and all the ornithischians, including Marginocephalia (like ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs), Thyreophorans (like stegosaurids and ankylosaurs), and ornithopods (hadrosaurs or duck-bills)



Q: Which dinosaur has the longest name
from cs, millwaukee, wisconsin, USA; November 9, 1999

A: Micropachycephalosaurus, which is a very small, plant-eating dinosaur.



Q: Who invented the term "dinosaur"? define the word "sauros"
from Drew B., edmonton, alberta, cananda; November 9, 1999

A: Richard Owen invented the term dinosaur. Sauros means lizard in Greek. For more information on this, click here.



Q: How did dinosaurs get their name?
from Matthew H., NJ, USA; November 9, 1999

A: Dinosaurs are usually named by the scientist who described the new genus. For a page on dinosaur naming conventions, click here.



Q: What did there skin feel like?
from alan k., Greenville, RI, USA; November 9, 1999

A: It probably varied from dinosaur to dinosaur. Many fossilized skin samples have been found. Some are "pebbly" (like T. rex) some are scaly.



Q: How do we know dinosaurs roared?
from Tiffany T., Cleveland, OH, USA; November 8, 1999

A: We don't. The only dinosaur whose sound has been analyzed is Parasaurolophus. It had a huge, hollow nasal crest which gives deep sounds when air is forced through it.



Q: Hi, I don't really have a question I just need some informations for my project on pterodactyls.
from Sabrina D.C., Auckland, N.Z.; November 8, 1999

A: For information on Pterodactyls, click here.



Q: I need any information you can give on the Fabrosaurus
from Vincent, leavenworth, Kansas, USA; November 8, 1999

A: For an entry on Fabrosaurus in the dino dictionary, click here.



Q: how much dose coelophysis weigh
from alejandro a, miami, fl, USA; November 8, 1999

A: Coelophysis weighed about 40 pounds (18 kg). For more information on Coelophysis, click here.



Q: Are Torosaurus meat eaters?
from Hannah P, Biloxi, Mississippi, USA; November 8, 1999

A: Torosaurus was a plant-eater (it was a ceratopsian, a horned dinosaur related to Triceratops). For more information on Torosaurus, click here.



Q: what was the deadliest dinasaur? i need this for school please answer quickly
from sal m., hazlet, NJ, USA; November 8, 1999

A: There's no definitive answer to this question. The dromaeosaurids were fast-moving, relatively intelligent, and armed with huge toe claws, so they might qualify. Utahraptor would be my choice.



Q: COULD YOU PLEASE PUT THE HIRONOSAURUS, KAGASAURUS, KATSUYAMASARUS, KITADANISAURUS, NIPPONOSAURUS, WAKINOSAURUS AND INTO THE INFORMATION SHEETS? ALSO, DO YOU KNOW OF ANY DINOSAUR MUSEUMS IN JAPAN? IF NOT, IS THERE ANY PLACE I COULD GO TO SEARCH FOR ONE? THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
from KYLE T., CHATAN CHO, OKINAWA, Japan; November 8, 1999

A: I've added these dinosaur to the dinosaur dictionary. I don't know anything about Japanese dinosaur museums.



Q: What is the name of the dinosaur older than Eoraptor??
from Jimmy L., Georgia, STATE, USA; November 7, 1999

A: I don't know its name. All the information I have is at: /subjects/dinosaurs/news/Oldest230.shtml



Q: I recently printed out a dinosaur info sheet on Alamosaurus. It was for kids and it had a picture and description. I think it was from a university website for kids. Any idea where it came from. I don't think it was from your site Thanks
from Kelsey C, Dover, DE, USA; November 7, 1999

A: For an Alamosaurus printout, click here.



Q: What is the oldest dinosaur fossil ever found?
from Nikki C., Chapmanville, West Virginia, USA; November 6, 1999

A: Until just recently, it was Eoraptor, which is about 228 million years ago. A new, even older fossil was foundin Madagasacar, an island off the coast of Africa. The new fossil is the jaw of a plant-eating dinosaur that is about 230 million years old.



Q: Why do paleontoligist think an astroid hit the Earth? I asked Because it would of crushed the Earth.
from Lauren S., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; November 6, 1999

A: They hypothesize that the asteroid was about 4-9 miles (6-15 km) in diameter, far too small to crush the Earth.



Q: Why dose evryone ask what color a dinosaurs skin was?I know what thier skin color was.It was every color of the rainbow.
from Cora C., Chapmanville, West Virginia, USA; November 6, 1999

A: Okay.



Q: how did the t-rex become extinct
from erin h., belfast, ulster, n. ireland, USA; November 6, 1999

A: T. rex went extinct during the K-T mass extinction. There are many theories why this extinction occured, the most popular of which is the Alvarez Asteroid Theory. For more info on T. rex, click here.



Q: Is there a such dino as lesothosaurus
from jaws w.; November 5, 1999

A: Yes, for more info on Lesothosaurus, click here.



Q: What does sauros mean.
from L,H, milwaukee, wi, USA; November 5, 1999

A: It means lizard in Greek.



Q: Where is the A to Z dinosaurs?
from Megan F., Windsor, MO, USA; November 4, 1999

A: For the list of dinosaur genera, click here.



Q: Did all dinosaurs have good eyesight?
from Martha G.,Charlotte, N.C., USA; November 4, 1999

A: Their eyesight varied. Some had large eyes (relative to their head size), others had smaller eyes. Also, some had the eyes positioned on opposite side of the head (like Gallimimus, ruling out the possibility of binocular vision), but others may have had at least partial binocular vision (like Carnotaurus).



Q: I am doing a report on Ouranosaurus. Can you tell everything you can about this dinosaurs. Can I get a great picture of this dinosaur too! Thanks for all your help.
from Jimmy B., Fairview Park, OH, USA; November 4, 1999

A: For information on Ouranosaurus, click here.



Q: What is the new dino they have found in oklahoma?
from bob, cleveland, oklahoma, USA; November 4, 1999

A: For information on Sauroposeidon, click here.



Q: What period came before the mesozoic era?
from katie, missouri, USA; November 4, 1999

A: The Permian period. For a short chart of geologic time, click here.



Q: Can you define the word sauros.
from cs, milwaukee, wi, USA; November 4, 1999

A: It means lizard in Greek.



Q: how much does the T Rex weigh ?
from cooper b., orlando, fl, USA; November 3, 1999

A: Roughly 5-7 tons. For more information on T rex, click here.



Q: a new dino was discovered in Oklahoma.It was named Sauroposeidon. Do you have information on this latest discovery?
from john b, pittsburgh, pa, USA; November 3, 1999

A: For information on Sauroposeidon, click here.



Q: How much does the Stegosaurs weigh?(pounds).
from ?; November 3, 1999

A: Stegosaurus weighed about 6,800 pounds (3100 kg).



Q: What did the Utahraptor look like? Do you have a picture?
from Grayden P., Taipei, Taipei County, Taiwan; November 3, 1999

A: For information and a drawing of Utahraptor, click here.



Q: What percent were meat eaters and what percent ate plants.
from Jayme K., Littlefield, TX, USA; November 2, 1999

A: If you look at dinosaur genera, roughly 65 percent of the dinosaurs were plant eaters and 35 percent were meat-eaters (or omnivores). If you look at the number of actual fossils found, the percentage of plant-eaters increases, since many fossils of some of the plant-eaters have been found. For example, over a hundred Protoceratops fossils have been found, but only about a dozen T. rex fossils have been found. For more information on dinosaur diets, click here.



Q: Why or how did dinosaurs get to be so huge and why aren't there any reptiles this huge today?
from Mrs. Cheatham's Class, Lewisburg, TN, USA; November 2, 1999

A: No one knows why some of the dinosaurs (and some other Mesozoic Era reptiles) got so huge and none do today. This is one of the most interesting unanswered questions in paleontology. There are a lot of theories, but most of them are pretty bizarre; none are generally accepted. Perhaps one of you will become a scientist someday and answer the fascinating question of what environmental pressures were different then and now to cause the huge size difference.



Q: what predators did the brachiosaurus have?
from Kate H., edinburgh, east lothian, Scotland; November 1, 1999

A: A healthy, adult Brachiosaurus probably had no predators. The largest-known meat-eaters from that time (the late Jurassic period) and place (North America and Africa) were Allosaurus, Ceratosaurus, and Torvosaurus. These theropods were less than half the size of Brachiosaurus, and probably had much easier prey to hunt (like smaller sauropods and ornithischians like stegosaurs).



Q: when did the icthyosaurs first appear
from James B.; November 1, 1999

A: They appeared during the early Triassic period, roughly 240 million years ago. For more information on Ichthyosaurs, click here.



Q: Was the female T-rex ficious than the male .
from Ben P., Adams-Friendship, Wisconsin, USA; November 1, 1999

A: No one knows. It's different for different aniamls, and with dinosaurs, we aren't even sure how to tell if a fossils was male or female.



Q: what dinosaur is the oldest? what is the smallest dinosaurs? what is the largest dinosaur? how many dinosaurs are there? how old was T Rex when he died? what dinosaur ate the most plants? what dinosaur ate the most meet?
from Casey S., Blairsville, USA; November 1, 1999

A: Most of these wuestions are answered in the faq's (frequently asked questions) above. No on e knows T. rex' age when it died. The dinosaurs that ate the most plants were probably the biggest sauropods, like Argentinosaurus and Andesaurus. The dinosaurs that ate the most meat were probably the biggest theropods, like T. rex, Giganotosaurus, and Caracharodontosaurus.



Q: who was the first to find a dinosaur fosill?
from Casey S., Blairsville, USA; November 1, 1999

A: Many people probalby found dinosaur fossils in ancient times, but thought they were the bones of dragons or other bizarre beasts. The first documented find was in 1676; a huge thigh bone (femur) was found in England by Reverend Plot. It was thought that the bone belonged to a "giant," but was probably from a dinosaur. A report of this find was published by R. Brookes in 1763. For more information on the early dinosaur fossil discoveries, click here.



Q: please send me information on the dinichthys.
from codie, duluth, mn, USA; November 1, 1999

A: Dinichthys, closely related to Dunkleosteus, was a heavily armored primitive fish from the Late Devonian period, about 400 million years ago. This top predator was up to 7 ft (2.1 m) long and had large, scissor-like cutting jaws with serrated, razor-sharp bones, but no teeth. Its skull was was over 2 feet (65 cm) long. For information on Dinichthys, click here.




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